Shenandoah National Park Oral History Collection, 1964-1999

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Summary Information

Repository:
Special Collections, Carrier Library, James Madison University
Creator:
Shenandoah National Park (Agency : U.S.)
Creator:
Smith, Dorothy Noble
Creator:
Potomac Appalachian Trail Club
Title:
Shenandoah National Park Oral History Collection
Collection No.:
SdArch SNP
Date:
1964-1999
Extent:
3 boxes, 200 audio discs, 158 audiocassettes, unnumbered reels, 1.5 Cubic Feet
Language of the Material:
English
Abstract:
The Shenandoah National Park Oral History Collection, SdArch SNP, 1964-1999, consists of audio, transcripts, and images pertaining to interviews conducted primarily by Dorothy Noble Smith in addition to members of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, park collaborators Eugene and Diane Zior Wilhelm, Darwin Lambert, and others.

Preferred Citation

identification of item, [box #, folder #], Shenandoah National Park Oral History Collection, SdArch SNP, Special Collections, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Va.

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Bio/Historical

Beginning in December 1924, groups like the Southern Appalachian National Park Committee and the Shenandoah National Park Association began to champion the project of creating a park in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. In the spring of 1926, Congress passed the bill authorizing the establishment of the Shenandoah National Park and the subsequent reclamation of lands owned or farmed by mountain residents. Subsequently over 450 families were relocated from the park boundaries and moved to nearby communities. After the park was officially established in December 1935, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) began building visitors centers throughout the mountains.

Dorothy Noble Smith (1915-1999) was a native of New Jersey and a graduate of Duke University. She had a distinguished career in banking in New York City before retiring to Luray, Virginia. She was a contributing writer for the Page News and Courier for more than twenty years. Fascinated by a way of life that was drastically altered with the creation of the Shenandoah National Park in December 1935 she, along with other people associated with the park service, conducted recorded interviews in the late 1970s and early 1980s to document the lives and stories of the former residents of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Her findings based on the oral histories conducted were published in Recollections: The People of the Blue Ridge Remember.

Founded in 1927 on the principles of volunteerism and public service to outdoor enthusiasts, the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC), headquartered in Vienna, Virginia, is one of 30 trail clubs located in cities along the Appalachian Trail. The PATC's section of trail includes 240 miles beginning at Pine Grove Furnace in Pennsylvania and ending at Rockfish Gap at the southern end of the Shenandoah National Park. The PATC's activities include building and maintaining trails, cabins, shelters, and publishing a monthly newsletter. PATC members Edward Garvey (1914-1999), Samuel Moore (1920-1999), and Walter Smith conducted interviews in this collection.

Diane Zior Wilhelm (1938-2010) and Eugene Joseph Wilhelm, Jr. conducted many of the earliest interviews within this collection. Diane's interests encompassed Andean Indians, Irish street-traders, New Jersey suburbanites, and Blue Ridge Mountain people focusing on an anthropological perspective. She taught at Middlesex County College in New Jersey from 1967 until her retirement in 2007. A year prior to her death, Dr. Wilhelm was contacted by Special Collections staff, and expressed interest in donating the remainder of her materials and notes from interviews to this collection. Eugene's interests included geography and ecology. He wrote his dissertation entitled Folk Georgraphy of the Blue Ridge Mountains while at Texas A & M. Eugene was a visiting geography professor at the University of Virginia and professor of geography at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Beginning in 1956, the couple often spent weeks during the summer in the Shenandoah National Park researching and interviewing mountain residents.

Darwin Lambert (1916-2007) was the first employee of the National Park Service at the Shenandoah National Park, hired March 1, 1936. Interested in the relationship between man and nature, He authored several books pertaining to the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Shenandoah National Park including those listed below in the bibliography and as related material. This collection was originally housed at the Shenandoah National Park headquarters in Luray, Virginia, but was never served to the public because the oral histories were not considered official park records. In May 2001, under the direction of Cultural Resource Specialist Reed Engle, the collection was donated to James Madison University.

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Scope and Content

The Shenandoah National Park Oral History Collection, SdArch SNP (formerly SC# 4030), 1964-1999, consists of 135 interviews of people who were living in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia prior to the creation of the Shenandoah National Park. Most of the interviewees resided on land that was claimed by eminent domain by the Commonwealth of Virginia and subsequently turned over to the U.S. Government in the 1930s. The collection is comprised of 6 Hollinger boxes and 6.6 linear feet of media cabinet drawers of audio, transcripts, and images pertaining to interviews conducted primarily by Dorothy Noble Smith as part of her research for Recollections: The People of the Blue Ridge Remember in additon to members of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, park collaborators Eugene and Diane Zior Wilhelm, Darwin Lambert, and others.

Topics discussed by interviewees include mountain folklife, music, food preservation, traditional medicine, agriculture and harvesting, bark peeling, moonshining, chores and family life, and schooling with additional references to the Civilian Conservation Corp, the New Deal, promoter of Skyland Resort and author George Freeman Pollock, and residents' feelings towards the creation of the Shenandoah National Park. Interviews conducted by Barbara Wright, Norman Taylor, Gloria Updike, and Ken Steeber were presumably added to the collection separately from the interviews conducted in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s.

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Arrangement

The collection is arranged alphabetically by interviewee's surname.

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Administrative Information

Revision Description

Updated by Tiffany ColeMedia inventoried and added to container list 2010-052019-07

Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research. Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the James Madison University Special Collections Library to use this collection.

Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Acquisition Information

The interviews comprising this collection were donated by Reed Engle, Shenandoah National Park Cultural Resource Specialist, on behalf of the National Park Service in May 2001.

Processing Information

Nearly all original interviews were recorded on five-inch reels. Most recordings had been transferred to audiocassettes, and later migrated to digital format. Most have a corresponding transcript.

Location

Special Collections, Carrier Library, James Madison University

880 Madison DriveMSC 1704Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807library-special@jmu.eduURL: https://www.lib.jmu.edu/special/

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Index Terms

Corporate Name

  • Shenandoah National Park (Agency : U.S.)

Geographic Name

  • Shenandoah National Park (Va.)
  • Shenandoah National Park (Va.) -- History

Subject

  • Mountain life -- Virginia -- Shenandoah National Park -- History
  • Mountain people -- Virginia -- Shenandoah National Park -- Social life and customs

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Bibliography

Interview with Cecil B. Graves by Diane Zior Wilhelm, May 10, 1966, SdArch SNP-056, in the Shenandoah National Park Oral History Collection SdArch SNP, Special Collections, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Va.

Lambert, Darwin. "The Undying Past of the Shenandoah National Park." Boulder, Co.: Roberts Rinehart, Inc. Publishers, 1989.

Reeder, Carolyn and Jack. "Shenandoah Heritage: The Story of the People Before the Park." Washington, D.C.: The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, 1978.

Potomac Appalachian Trail Club. "History of PATC." www.patc.net. https://www.patc.net/PATC/WHO_WE_ARE/Our_History/PATC/Who_We_Are/Our_History.aspx?hkey=4952940f-61c2-48b9-a2ea-35308a2b9381(accessed June 7, 2018).

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Collection Inventory

Title/Description Instances
Arlene Carr Abel interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 2, 1979

Arlene Carr Abel interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 2, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Arlene Carr Abel who grew up in Sugar Hollow, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes her home and family life, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, corn shucking and apple butter boiling parties, wild game hunting, home remedies and folk medicine. Includes references to holiday celebrations, mountain music, her father's occupation as a tanner and tales of local moonshiner.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 2, 1979 box 1 folder 1
Preservation master cd, October 2, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0001
Preservation master cd, October 2, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0002
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 2, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-001
Ada Addie Anderson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 29, 1978

Ada Addie Anderson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 29, 1978

Records the reminiscences of Ada Addie Anderson, (née Smith), with contributions from Vallie Cave, Beulah Sirbaugh and Nell Woodward. Due to the conversational nature of the interview, only Mrs. Anderson's and the interviewer's remarks are identified in the transcript, with comments from the other participants dispersed throughout. Describes home and family life, daily chores, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, soap making, raising livestock and wild game hunting. Includes numerous references to and anecdotes about family members, friends and neighbors known to all four women.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 29, 1978 box 1 folder 2
Preservation master cd, September 29, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0003
Preservation master cd, September 29, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0004
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 29, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-002
Beulah Atkins interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, January 31, 1979

Beulah Atkins interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, January 31, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Beulah Atkins, who grew up in Beech Spring, Virginia prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes her home and family life, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, soap making, collecting ginseng and wild game hunting. Includes references to the local Civilian Conservation Corps camp, wakes and funerals, and her work with her father and husband in the barrel making business.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, January 31, 1979 box 1 folder 3
Preservation master cd, January 31, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0005
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 31, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-003
Elmer Atkins interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Jim Northrup, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, July 24, 1979

Elmer Atkins interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Jim Northrup, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, July 24, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Elmer Atkins, who was born and raised near Beech Spring, Virginia prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes his home and family life, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are farming, raising of livestock, log homes and the local bark peeling industry. Includes references to revival meetings, wakes and funerals, herbal remedies, moonshining, the Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919 and the chestnut tree blight that decimated the species in the early decades of the 20th century. Mr. Atkins also comments on the forced eviction of his family and neighbors to make way for the construction of the national park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, July 24, 1979 box 1 folder 4
Preservation master cd, July 24, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0006
Preservation master cd, July 24, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0009
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 24, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-004
Sallie Atkins interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, February 27, 1979

Sallie Atkins interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, February 27, 1979

Records the reminiscences of sisters Sallie Atkins and Lela Dodson, who were raised in in a one room log cabin near Hazel Mountain, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. They are joined by childhood friend, Beulah Atkins, who lived nearby. Describes home and family life, daily chores, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, soap making, raising livestock and wild game hunting. Includes references to the tan bark industry, wakes and funerals, and local shoemakers and merchants

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, February 27, 1979 box 1 folder 5
Preservation master cd, February 27, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0007
Preservation master cd, February 27, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0008
Preservation master cd, copy 2, February 27, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0010
Preservation master cd, copy 2, February 27, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0011
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, February 27, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-005
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, copy 2, February 27, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-006
Louise Wood Austin interviewed by John D. Dooms, April 13, 1979

Louise Wood Austin interviewed by John D. Dooms, April 13, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Louise Wood Austin, who grew up in Sugar Hollow, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Mrs. Austin and her interviewer, John Dooms, returned to the section of Shenandoah National Park where her family home stood until 1941. Describes her home life and family history, including members of her extended family who represent a cross section of local family names. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, raising livestock, home remedies and folk medicine. Recalls cattle drives from Ivy, Va., to summer pastures in Jarman Gap, itinerant Syrian peddlers, midwives and square dances. Discusses several small businesses operated by her father and uncles, including a blacksmith shop, distillery and coffin making shop.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, April 13, 1979 box 1 folder 6
Preservation master cd, April 13, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0012
Victor Baker interviewed by Barbara Maynes, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, December 13, 1979

Victor Baker interviewed by Barbara Maynes, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, December 13, 1979

Records the reminiscences of four Virginia residents who grew up near the Black Rock Springs Hotel, in Black Rock Gap, Virginia. The Black Rock Springs Hotel was a popular tourist destination in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, both for its scenic views and for the natural mineral springs for which it was named. The participants discuss the history of the hotel, their own memories of the grounds and buildings and the hotel's destruction by fire in 1909. Includes references to people associated with the hotel and springs, as well as many of the families and local people who lived near the hotel in its heyday. The site where the hotel stood was incorporated into Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 13, 1979 box 1 folder 7
Preservation master cd, December 13, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0013
Preservation master cd, December 13, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0014
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 13, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-007
Joseph J. Baldwin interviewed by Smith, Dorothy Noble, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, April 6, 1979

Joseph J. Baldwin interviewed by Smith, Dorothy Noble, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, April 6, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Joseph J. Baldwin, who grew up near the Big Meadows area of what would become Shenandoah National Park. Describes home and family life, daily chores, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, dairy cows, traditional herbal medicines and fur trapping. Includes references to weddings, wakes and funerals, moonshiners, the chestnut tree blight and severe local droughts in the1930s.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 6, 1979 box 1 folder 8
Preservation master cd, April 6, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0015
Preservation master cd, April 6, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0016
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 6, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-008
Harold Baugher interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 23, 1985

Harold Baugher interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 23, 1985

Records the reminiscences of Harold Baugher who grew up in Swift Run, Virginia, in the 1930s, on a farm that became part of Shenandoah National Park. Describes home and family life, daily chores, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, traditional herbal medicines and apple orchards. Includes references to wakes and funerals, sorghum production, bark peeling, Kris Kringling and the evictions of local families to make way for the national park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 23, 1985 box 1 folder 9
Preservation master cd, October 23, 1985 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0017
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 23, 1985 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-009
Virginia H. Taylor interviewed by Matthew Dalbey, April 25, 1979

Virginia H. Taylor interviewed by Matthew Dalbey, April 25, 1979

Records an interview with Virginia Taylor, (née Haney), who grew up the Blue Ridge Mountains, near Greene County, Va. Describes daily life in the mountains, where her family operated a general store. Gives her recollections of the mountain people and describes in detail her family's experience resettling in Wolftown, Virginia, after the opening of Shenandoah National Park. Mrs. Taylor's family soon relocated to Stanardsville, where she attended high school in the late 1930s. Describes the uneasy social interactions between the local population and the sudden influx of rural mountain people into their community. There is no audio recording for this interview; interview consists of transcript only.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, April 25, 1979 box 1 folder 10
Isaac William Beahm interviewed by Charles Anibal, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, September 7, 1979

Isaac William Beahm interviewed by Charles Anibal, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, September 7, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Isaac W. Beahm, who was born in the Batman Hollow area of Page County, Virginia, on a farm that would eventually become part of Shenandoah National Park. Describes his early home life, the loss of both parents when he was six years old, and the difficulties of running a small farm at the beginning of the 20th century. Recalls his school days at the Rocky Branch School, farm chores, and various odd jobs he held, such as working at local saw mills and tanneries, as well as helping to construct Skyline Drive. Discusses family gatherings, such as apple butter boilings, hog butchering and the folk music and dancing that often ensued. The interview was conducted at the home of Mr. Beahm's daughter, who is not named in the interview, but whose comments are interspersed throughout. Both Mr. Beahm and his daughter mention participating in the dedication ceremonies for the park, conducted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1936. The Beahms were one of the few families to move from the area voluntarily, prior to the opening of the park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 7, 1979 box 1 folder 11
Preservation master cd, September 7, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0018
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 7, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-010
Lyle Beahm interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, July 12, 1978

Lyle Beahm interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, July 12, 1978

Records the reminiscences of Lyle E. Beahm, who was born in the Jewell Hollow area of Page County, Virginia, on a farm that would eventually become part of Shenandoah National Park. Describes his early home and family life, school days at the Shenk Hollow School, farm chores,and folk remedies. Discusses family gatherings, such as apple butter boilings, hog butchering and funerals. Briefly mentions the Civilian Conservation Corps, racial segregation and intra-family marriages. An unnamed woman, identified only as Mrs. in the transcript, and believed to be Eva Sours, contributes to the interview as well.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, July 12, 1978 box 1 folder 12
Preservation master cd, July 12, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0019
Preservation master cd, July 12, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0020
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 12, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-011
George Berry interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, November 14, 1978

George Berry interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, November 14, 1978

Records the reminiscences of George Berry, who was born in the Cool Springs area near Fishers Gap, Virginia, in a log house on land that would eventually become part of Shenandoah National Park. Describes his early home and family life, school days at the Forrest Dale School, farm chores,and folk remedies. Discusses family gatherings, folk music, bark peeling and local moonshiners. Recalls his experiences working for the New Deal relief programs, the National Youth Administration as a boy, and later for its parent program, the Works Progress Administration. Mr. Berry recalls playing folk music for tourists at scenic stops along Skyline drive. Also discussed are the evictions of families from their homes, subsequently located within park boundaries, and the long term social and economic effects on those people over the following decades.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 14, 1978 box 1 folder 13
Preservation master cd, November 14, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0021
Preservation master cd, November 14, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0022
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 14, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-012
Edward D. Freeland interviewed by Darwin Lambert, transcribed by Chelsea Gutshall, December 16, 1978

Edward D. Freeland interviewed by Darwin Lambert, transcribed by Chelsea Gutshall, December 16, 1978

Records an interview with Edward D. Freeland, Superintendent of Shenandoah National Park from 1942 to 1950. Mr. Freeland describes conditions at the park at the beginning of World War II. With the onset of the war, the federal government ended the Civilian Conservation Corps project, (CCC), the single largest source of labor for the National Park Service, as most CCC personnel went into the armed services. The CCC laborers were eventually replaced by men from the Civilian Public Service, (CPS), the national program through which conscientious objectors could perform their national service. Gas rationing and travel restrictions greatly reduced the number of visitors to the park during the war years. Discusses the controversy surrounding post-war racial integration of the park, the creation and expansion of Skyline Drive and the Appalachian trail, living conditions among the local mountain people prior to the establishment of the park and the activities of local moonshiners. Numerous individuals associated with Shenandoah National Park, the National Park Service and the Virginia Sky-Line Company are mentioned throughout the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 16, 1978 box 1 folder 14
Preservation master cd, December 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0023
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-013
John Bradley interviewed by Smith, Dorothy Noble, transcribed by D. P. Hammond, September 16, 1977

John Bradley interviewed by Smith, Dorothy Noble, transcribed by D. P. Hammond, September 16, 1977

Records the reminiscences of John Bradley, who grew up near the Jewell Hollow area of what would become Shenandoah National Park. Describes home and family life, daily chores, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, grist mills, traditional herbal medicines and fur trapping. Includes references to the weddings, wakes and funerals, moonshiners and licensed distillers, toll roads and Skyline Drive. Also refers briefly to local military skirmishes during the Civil War. Mr. Bradley describes communal activities such as apple butter boilings and occasions known locally as frolics where farm families would gather to help their neighbors plow fields or clear away stones. Discusses the impact of the forced eviction of local residents to make way for the national park. Also present for the interview was Mr. Bradley's wife, who is identified only as Mrs. Bradley in the transcript, but whose comments appear throughout.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 16, 1977 box 1 folder 15
Preservation master cd, September 16, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0024
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 16, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-014
Everett Breeden interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, June 16, 1986

Everett Breeden interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, June 16, 1986

Records the reminiscences of Everett Breeden, who grew up on Tanners Ridge, in Page County, Virginia prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Also contributing to the interview is Mr. Breeden's wife, whose first name is not mentioned. Mrs. Breeden gives her maiden name as Thomas, and identifies her father as William Henry Thomas, also of Page County. Based on this information, she is believed to be Junie Catherine Breeden. Together, they describe their early home and family lives, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, soap making, folk medicine and wild game hunting. Includes references to the local Civilian Conservation Corps camp, burial rites, and midwives. Mr. Breeden worked on the construction of Camp Hoover, also known as Rapidan Camp, which was the first presidential retreat. President Herbert Hoover commissioned the construction of the facility in 1929, which he later donated to Shenandoah National Park. Mr. Breeden recounts meeting and speaking with the president on several occasions at the retreat, which Mr. Hoover referred to as his Summer White House.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, June 16, 1986 box 1 folder 16
Preservation master cd, June 16, 1986 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0025
Preservation master cd, June 16, 1986 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0026
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 16, 1986 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-015
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 16, 1986 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-016
Preston Breeden interviewed by Edward B. Garvey, Charles Anibal and Samuel Moore, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 11, 1979

Preston Breeden interviewed by Edward B. Garvey, Charles Anibal and Samuel Moore, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 11, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Preston Breeden, who was born in 1917 and raised on a small farm where Pocosin Cabin now stands near the Appalachian Trail route through Shenandoah National Park. Mr. Breeden was interviewed by Edward B. Garvey and Samuel Moore of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, (PATC), which maintains the cabin, and Charles Anibal, Assistant Park Naturalist for Shenandoah National Park (SNP). The tone of the interview is largely conversational, with all four men contributing information about the region at the time of the founding and construction of Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s. Mr. Breeden describes his youth and early home life on the farm, including the crops grown by his family and the livestock they raised. Discusses his early working years in the local saw mills and barrel stave mills, hauling wood for the tan bark industry and his two-year stint with the Civilian Conservation Corps, where he worked as a foreman during the construction of Skyline Drive. The group visits the remains of the Upper Pocosin Mission, an Episcopal church where Mr. Breeden's mother and aunt lived briefly after their home was taken by the state by eminent domain. Mr. Breeden recalls the general mood of the local community regarding their forced evictions by the state of Virginia. He speaks at length of many of the local families, prominent landowners and small businessmen. Includes comments on the area's fish and wild game in his youth, the annual apple and chestnut harvests, general stores, cemeteries, grist mills and the activities of some local moonshiners.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, September 11, 1979 box 1 folder 17
Preservation master cd, September 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0027
Preservation master cd, September 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0028
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-017
Weldon Burke interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Debbie McCormick, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, September 21, 1977

Weldon Burke interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Debbie McCormick, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, September 21, 1977

Records the reminiscences of Weldon Burke, who grew up near the summit of Hazel Mountain, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes home and family life, daily chores, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, raising livestock and gathering wild chestnuts and ginseng. Includes references to the tan bark industry, wakes and funerals, local merchants, and moonshiners.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 21, 1977 box 1 folder 18
Preservation master cd, September 21, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0029
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 21, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-018
James Burner interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 19, 1978

James Burner interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 19, 1978

Records the reminiscences of James Burner, who was born in Page County, Virginia, not far from the future site of Shenandoah National Park. Mr. Burner served in the Civilian Conservation Corps, (CCC), during the construction of the park and later became a park ranger in the National Park Service. Describes his experiences working with local mountaineer men in the CCC camps, their history and social conditions in the 1930s. Mr. Burner refers to numerous local mountain families and prominent individuals involved in the creation of the park. Topics include mountain agriculture and wildlife, folk music and dancing, traditional medicines, clothing, schooling, feuds and moonshiners. Mr. Burner was present at the founding of the first CCC camps in Virginia and discusses them in great detail. As a naturalist and conservationist, he discusses the local flora and fauna of the region in great depth as well. Identifies numerous local plant and animal species and their habitats. Comments on early efforts to rebuild the local deer population while reducing the number of wild bears. Comments on the social and economic effects of the Chestnut Blight of the 1930s on local families.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 19, 1978 box 1 folder 19
Preservation master cd, September 19, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0030
Preservation master cd, September 19, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0031
Preservation master cd, September 19, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0032
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 19, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-019
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 19, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-020
Edna Burrill interviewed by Darwin Lambert, transcribed by Chelsea Gutshall, January 30, 1980

Edna Burrill interviewed by Darwin Lambert, transcribed by Chelsea Gutshall, January 30, 1980

Records an interview with Edna Elizabeth Burrill, (née Browning), regarding her uncle, James Burrill, who sold a large parcel of land to the state of Virginia in the 1930s to be used for Shenandoah National Park. Mrs. Burrill is joined by her two daughters, Mary Ellen Jennings and Gladys Peaches Burrill, both of Luray, Va. James Burrill was born in Leeds, England, around 1850 and emigrated to the United States as a young man. Burrill soon established himself in America and sent for his wife Ellen, also of Leeds, to join him. Over the next thirty years, James Burrill would achieve great success in a number of business opportunities which enabled him to act as benefactor for numerous civic and commercial ventures in Page County. Mrs. Burrill recalls her uncle's sale of land, estimated at 4,200 acres, to the state at prices ranging from $2.50 to $10.00 dollars per acre. Also mentioned is James Burrill's contribution to the establishment of the Deford Tannery, (later known as Virginia Oak Tannery), and the founding of Christ Episcopal Church of Luray.

Conditions Governing Use:

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Transcript and supporting documents, January 30, 1980 box 1 folder 20
Preservation master cd, January 30, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0033
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 30, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-021
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 30, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-022
Walter Carter interviewed by Ken Steeber, with Walter Smith, Gloria Updike and Howard Struthers, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, January 1, 1978

Walter Carter interviewed by Ken Steeber, with Walter Smith, Gloria Updike and Howard Struthers, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, January 1, 1978

Records the reminiscences of Walter Carter, whose family owned apple orchards on Dickey Ridge, just south of Front Royal, Virginia, in the decades preceding the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. Describes the physical layout of the the orchards and surrounding towns. Discusses the demise of the apple industry in that part of the Shenandoah Valley due to a shrinking work force, as local families were evicted by the state to make room for the park. In the years prior to the Second World War, the primary customer for the Carter's apples, the United Kingdom, placed restrictive tariffs on U.S. grown apples which made it impossible to compete with fruit from Canada and New Zealand. The second part of the interview consists of a driving tour of the orchard area, with Mr. Carter describing the former locations of buildings, roads, home sites and cemeteries. The group is joined by Mr. Carter's wife, Caroline Carter, whose own recollections and comments are included in the discussion. The Carters make numerous references to local families and landowners. Includes comments on the construction of Skyline Drive, which, while providing north-south access along the crests of the Blue Ridge Mountains, resulted in the closing of numerous east-west routes across the mountains.

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The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, January 1, 1978 box 2 folder 1
Preservation master cd, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0034
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-023
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-024
Elzie Cave interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, July 6, 1964

Elzie Cave interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, July 6, 1964

Records the reminiscences of Mr. and Mrs. Elzie Cave, who were born and raised in Dark Hollow, Virginia prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Mrs. Cave's full name is not given in the course of the interview, but an accompanying typed manuscript gives her name as Lula Breeden Cave. Describes their early home and family lives, schooling, marriage, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are farming, raising of livestock, local wildlife and the bark peeling industry. Includes references to Civil War ancestors, wakes and funerals, herbal remedies and the weather extremes of drought and record snows in the 1920s and 30s.

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The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, July 6, 1964 box 2 folder 2
Preservation master cd, July 6, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0035
Preservation master cd, July 6, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0036
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 6, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-025
Elzie Cave interviewed by Amanda Moody and Leigh Jones, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, August 27, 1978

Elzie Cave interviewed by Amanda Moody and Leigh Jones, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, August 27, 1978

Mr. Cave leads a walking and driving tour of the area around the Cave family homestead in Dark Hollow, Virginia, where he was raised prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. The tour includes a stop at the Cave family cemetery, where Mr. Cave identifies the grave sites of his extended family, going back to the Civil War, and explains the genealogy of the various family members interred there. Includes references to Civil War era ancestors, moonshiners, bark peeling, copper mining, ginseng and chestnut harvesting, and other natural features of Dark Hollow.

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The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 27, 1978 box 2 folder 3
Preservation master cd, August 27, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0037
Preservation master cd, August 27, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0038
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 27, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-026
Evidell Cave interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, January 9, 1966

Evidell Cave interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, January 9, 1966

Records the reminiscences of Evidell Cave, who was born and raised in Dark Hollow, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes her early home and family life, schooling, marriage, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are farming and food preservation, livestock, local wildlife, and the bark peeling industry. Includes references to local families, moonshine, herbal remedies, Camp Hoover and the effects of the chestnut tree blight on the local economy.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, January 9, 1966 box 2 folder 4
Preservation master cd, January 9, 1966 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0039
Preservation master cd, January 9, 1966 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0040
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 9, 1966 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-027
Ralph Cave interviewed by Nancy Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 20, 1969

Ralph Cave interviewed by Nancy Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 20, 1969

Records the reminiscences of Ralph Cave, who was born and raised in Dark Hollow, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes his early home and family life, schooling, marriage and community events. Mr. Cave recounts the history of the Cave family in Dark Hollow as well as marriages and other interactions between the Caves and other local families. Numerous references are made to individual members of the Breeden, Thomas, and Weakley families. Describes his own experiences working on Skyline Drive and Camp Hoover in the early 1930s, as well as his personal memories of Skyland developer, George Pollock. Among the topics discussed are farming, raising of livestock, local wildlife and the bark peeling industry. Includes references to community activities such as corn shucking and apple butter boiling, herbal remedies and the record snows in the 1920s and 30s.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 20, 1969 box 2 folder 5
Preservation master cd, April 20, 1969 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0041
Preservation master cd, April 20, 1969 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0042
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 20, 1969 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-028
Vallie Cave interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Octavia Allis, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, September 11, 1979

Vallie Cave interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Octavia Allis, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, September 11, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Vallie Cave, (née Thomas), and her brother, Floyd Thomas, who were born and raised near Bootens Gap, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes home and family life, daily chores, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, soap making, raising livestock and wild game hunting. Includes references to trapping, moonshining, courtship, the chestnut tree blight, Camp Hoover and meetings with President Hoover. This collection includes two copies of the typed transcript, which note that the transcript is unfinished, with approximately another 15 minutes of taped interview remaining. Also included is a handwritten transcript containing minor notes omitted from the typed copies.

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The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 11, 1979 box 2 folder 6
Preservation master cd, September 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0043
Preservation master cd, September 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0044
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-029
Charles Chapman interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, January 3, 1979

Charles Chapman interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, January 3, 1979

Records a brief interview with Charles Chapman, a life-long resident of Luray, Virginia, and a carillonneur of international renown. Mr. Chapman's father owned a grocery store in Luray that served many of the local mountain families from 1904 until the 1940s. Recalls his earliest memories of the mountain people and their transactions with his father. Includes references to the annual chestnut harvest and seasonal mountain wildfires. Mr. Chapman also reminisces about local entrepreneur, George Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, January 3, 1979 box 2 folder 7
Preservation master cd, January 3, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0045
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 3, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-030
Mary Early and George A. Coyner, interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Allie Giroux and Victoria M. Edwards, March 27, 1980

Mary Early and George A. Coyner, interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Allie Giroux and Victoria M. Edwards, March 27, 1980

Records the reminiscences of Mary Early, (née Leonard), who lived in New Hope, not far from the Black Rock Springs Hotel, in Black Rock Gap, Virginia. The Black Rock Springs Hotel was a popular tourist destination in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, both for its scenic views and for the natural mineral springs for which it was named. Mrs. Early recounts her memories of the grounds and buildings and the popularity of the site in the years following the hotel's destruction by fire in 1909. Includes references to people associated with the hotel and springs, as well as many of the families and local people who lived near the hotel in its heyday. The site where the hotel stood was incorporated into Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s. Joining Mrs. Early in the interview is her son-in-law, George Coyner.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 27, 1980 box 2 folder 8
Preservation master cd, March 27, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0046
Preservation master cd, March 27, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0047
Preservation master cd, March 27, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0048
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 27, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-031
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 27, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-032
Wallace Ross and Martha Coffey: interviewed by Ed Elmwert, Eugene Wilhelm, Diane Wilhelm, April 15, 1979

Wallace Ross and Martha Coffey: interviewed by Ed Elmwert, Eugene Wilhelm, Diane Wilhelm, April 15, 1979

Consists of a fragmentary recording of Wallace Ross Coffey and his wife, Martha, (née Goode). The discussion focuses on Martha Coffey's upcoming birthday and the Coffey's 50th wedding anniversary coming up on September 12, 1964.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 15, 1979 box 2 folder 9
Preservation master cd, April 15, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0049
Preservation master cd, April 15, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0181
Lucille Blose Coffman interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, March 18, 1979

Lucille Blose Coffman interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, March 18, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Lucille V. Coffman, (née Blose), and her husband, who is not named in the interview, but is believed to be Benjamin P. Coffman, both of whom grew up near the southern edge of Shenandoah National Park. Describes home and family life, daily chores, schooling, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, raising livestock, wild game hunting and fishing. Includes references to the herbal remedies, moonshiners, the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 and the chestnut tree blight of the early part of the 20th century. Refers to the origins of the Blose family in Virginia and interactions between the mountain people and locals living in the Shenandoah Valley.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 18, 1979 box 2 folder 10
Preservation master cd, March 18, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0050
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 18, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-033
Rufus and Hazel Cline interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Allie Giroux and Victoria M. Edwards, November 5, 1980

Rufus and Hazel Cline interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Allie Giroux and Victoria M. Edwards, November 5, 1980

Records the reminiscences of Rufus and Hazel Cline, (née Garber), who lived in New Hope, not far from the Black Rock Springs Hotel, in Black Rock Gap, Virginia. The Black Rock Springs Hotel was a popular tourist destination in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, both for its scenic views and for the natural mineral springs for which it was named. Mr. and Mrs. Cline recount their memories of the grounds and buildings and the popularity of the site in the years following the hotel's destruction by fire in 1909. Includes references to people associated with the hotel and springs, as well as many of the families and local people who lived near the hotel in its heyday. The site where the hotel stood was incorporated into Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 5, 1980 box 2 folder 11
George Corbin interviewed by Edward Garvey, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, November 23, 1977

George Corbin interviewed by Edward Garvey, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, November 23, 1977

Records an interview conducted by Edward Garvey of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC) with George Corbin, who lived in Nicholson Hollow, Virginia from 1888 to 1938. The Corbin homestead was located on part of the land turned over to the NPS by the state of Virginia in the 1930s. Corbin describes the circumstances at the time of the construction of the log cabin he built for his family in 1909. The logs for the cabin were harvested locally by Corbin, who then cut and shaped them using axes and other hand tools. Corbin recalls the day of the house raising when ten friends and neighbors joined him to assemble all of the walls and rafters within the course of a single day. The cabin was later turned over to the PATC for use as a trail shelter in 1954, and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Buildings as the George T. Corbin Cabin. Edward Garvey was part of the PATC crew that restored the cabin for public use. Corbin elaborates on local methods of raising and storing crops and vegetables, collecting tan bark, funerals and burial rituals, and gives a detailed account of his experiences distilling moonshine. Includes a discussion on the Corbin and Nicholson family cemetery, as well as the local schoolhouse and church. Mr. Corbin speaks at length of the genealogies of the Corbins and the Nicholsons, as well as many of the other local mountain families. Included are anecdotes regarding businessman and entrepreneur George Pollock, owner of Skyland resort, and several local residents.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 23, 1977 box 2 folder 12
Preservation master cd, November 23, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0051
George Corbin, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, July 3, 1964

George Corbin, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, July 3, 1964

Records an interview with George Corbin, who leads a party of researchers from the National Park Service (NPS) and the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC) on a walking tour of the Corbin homestead in Nicholson Hollow. The primary interviewer does not identify himself on the tape, but does name Edward Garvey of the PATC as a member of the group, and another participant gives his name as Paul Lee. The Corbin homestead was located on part of the land turned over to the NPS by the state of Virginia in the 1930s. Corbin identifies the sites of a number of homesteads and the names of their former occupants, including a tour of the cabin he built in 1909, which was turned over to the PATC for use as a trail shelter and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Buildings as the George T. Corbin Cabin. The tour includes a visit to the Corbin and Nicholson family cemetery and the site of the local schoolhouse. Mr. Corbin speaks at length of the genealogies of the Corbins and the Nicholsons, as well as many of the other local mountain families. Included are numerous anecdotes regarding businessman and entrepreneur George Pollock, owner of Skyland resort, and a discussion of the activities of several area moonshiners, including Mr. Corbin. The last quarter of the interview features the comments of an unidentified woman presumably a relative of Mr. Corbin.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, July 3, 1964 box 2 folder 13
Preservation master cd, July 3, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0052
Preservation master cd, July 3, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0053
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 3, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-034
Robert Hilton Corbin interviewed by Allan Tanner and Paul Lee, December 1, 1977

Robert Hilton Corbin interviewed by Allan Tanner and Paul Lee, December 1, 1977

Records an interview with Robert H. Corbin, who leads a party of researchers from the National Park Service (NPS), the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC) and several family members on a walking tour of Nicholson Hollow. The primary interviewers are Allen Tanner of the PATC and Paul Lee of the NPS. Additional questions and commentary are provided by Mr. Corbin's son, Joe, and other family members. The Corbin homestead was located on part of the land turned over to the NPS by the state of Virginia in the 1930s. The primary focus of the tour was the identification of home sites and their owners along the length of Nicholson Hollow. Discusses home and family life in the mountains, including the tan bark industry, apple, chestnut and ginseng harvesting, food cultivation and preservation, and the moonshine business. Community gatherings, such as weddings, funerals, corn husking and apple butter boiling parties are also discussed, with passing mentions of Camp Hoover and local entrepreneur George Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort. Mr. Corbin, who was nearly 80 years old, gives an extensive account of many of the inhabitants of Nicholson and Corbin Hollows, as well as Corbin Mountain. The second eldest of 21 children, Corbin was related by blood or marriage to most of the surrounding families. Some of the more notable relatives mentioned include Corbin's cousin George T. Corbin, builder of the landmark Corbin Cabin, Aaron Nicholson and Phinnel Fennel Corbin, who were both featured in George Pollock's book Skyland: Heart of the Shenandoah Valley. Corbin describes two local murders, including that of his father, William J. Corbin, who was killed by a family member, John Nicholson, in 1922.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 1, 1977 box 2 folder 14
Use copy cd, December 1, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0054
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 1, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-035
Clarence Somers interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Jim Cotter, transcribed by Jeanette Shapiro, January 1, 1978

Clarence Somers interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Jim Cotter, transcribed by Jeanette Shapiro, January 1, 1978

Records an interview with Clarence Somers, who planted and maintained the Judd Gardens at Skyland Resort from 1922 to 1945. Judd Gardens were named for George and Marianna Judd of Washington, DC, who owned several lots and cabins at Skyland, including the land where the gardens were laid out in 1910. Mrs. Judd was allowed to remain at Skyland after the property was incorporated into Shenandoah National Park in 1936, until her death in 1958. The gardens were abandoned by order of the National Park Service in 1945. The interview consists chiefly of comparisons of plants and trees found at during a recent botanical survey of the site of the gardens, conducted by Jim Cotter of the National Park Service, with Mr. Somers' recollection of the garden plantings through 1945. Comments by a woman identified only as Mrs. Somers, (believed to be Beulah V. Somers, (née Sours)), occur throughout the interview, as do references to George F. Pollock, owner of Skyland Resort.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, January 1, 1978 box 2 folder 15
Preservation master cd, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0055
Use copy cd, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0056
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-035
Virgil Corbin, interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, August 9, 1978

Virgil Corbin, interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, August 9, 1978

Records the reminiscences of Virgil Corbin, who was born and raised in Corbin Cabin, in Nicholson Hollow, Virginia prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes his home and family life, holidays and community events. Among the topics discussed are farming, raising of livestock, hunting, fishing and food preservation techniques. Includes references to weddings, wakes and funerals, herbal remedies, moonshining, and ginseng. Mr. Corbin also speaks of relatives from both the Corbin and Nicholson sides of his family, including his father, George T. Corbin, his grandfather and two great-uncles who served in the Confederate army. Includes a two page manuscript, written by Mr. Corbin, titled From a Primitive Life to Modern Living. Corbin Cabin was the homestead built by George Corbin in 1910 and is one of the few intact cabins remaining in Shenandoah National Park. It was turned over to the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club in the 1950s, restored and currently serves as a popular trail shelter. The building is listed on the National Registry of Historic Buildings as the George T. Corbin Cabin. See SdArch no. SNP-33 for an interview with George Corbin.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 9, 1978 box 2 folder 16
Preservation master cd, August 9, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0057
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 9, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-036
Claud Cullers interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 10, 1978

Claud Cullers interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 10, 1978

Records the reminiscences of Claud W. Cullers, a lifelong resident of Rileyville, Virginia, who raised cattle throughout the 1920s and 1930s. Mr. Cullers would move his cattle to mountain pastures each year, where they would graze into the fall. Describes his memories of the local mountain people, their modes of living and sources of income. Discusses the bark and lumber industries, chestnut, apple and berry harvests, and prominent local moonshiners. A woman with the surname Keyser, identified as Mrs. Cullers' niece, also contributes to the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 10, 1978 box 2 folder 17
Preservation master cd, May 10, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0058
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 9, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-037
Bennie Cupp, with Lula Roach and Hazel Marshall Roach interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 6, 1978

Bennie Cupp, with Lula Roach and Hazel Marshall Roach interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 6, 1978

Records the reminiscences of Bennie Cupp, his grandmother, Lula Roach, and his aunt, Hazel Marshall Roach, who lived near Rocky Bar, Virginia, an area that became part of Shenandoah National Park. Much of the interview centers around the reminiscences of Lula Roach, who was 95 years old at the time and who recalled many details of everyday life in the Blue Ridge Mountains around the turn of the 20th century. Describes home and family life, school days, farm chores, livestock, wild game and folk remedies. Discusses family gatherings, such as holidays, apple butter boilings, hog butchering and funerals. Other topics include the various means of earning a living available to the local residents, such as bark peeling, cutting poles and ties for the railroads, the apple, chestnut and ginseng harvests and the production of moonshine.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 6, 1978 box 2 folder 18
Preservation master cd, October 6, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0059
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 6, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-038
Randal Dean interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, April 10, 1994

Randal Dean interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, April 10, 1994

Records the reminiscences of Randal Dean, who was born and raised on Dean Mountain, near Elkton, Virginia, an area that became part of Shenandoah National Park. Describes home and family life, school days, farm chores, livestock and his work in his father's saw mill. Discusses family gatherings, such as holidays, apple butter boilings, hog butchering and funerals. Includes references to bark peeling and local moonshiners.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, April 10, 1994 box 2 folder 19
Preservation master cd, April 10, 1994 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0060
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 10, 1994 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-039
Lola Deane interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 14, 1980

Lola Deane interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 14, 1980

Records the reminiscences of Lola Deane, who moved to the Pine Grove area, bordering Shenandoah National Park, in 1950. The interview deals chiefly with her memories and impressions of the mountain people who lived in the area at that time. Includes references to the gardens and livestock raised by the local people, their methods of food preservation, popular holiday traditions and the problems resulting from long-term intermarriage within small communities. Several references to the works of Episcopal missionary, Deaconess Mary Sandys Hutton, occur throughout the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 14, 1980 box 2 folder 20
Preservation master cd, May 14, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0062
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 14, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-040
Mamie Jenkins Dearing interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 28, 1977

Mamie Jenkins Dearing interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 28, 1977

Records the reminiscences of Mamie Dearing, who grew up near Dark Hollow, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. Describes her early home and family life, household chores, and school days. Discusses the growing, harvesting and preserving of food, hog butchering, apple butter boilings and herbal remedies. Includes references to holidays, weddings, funerals, and courting.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 28, 1977 box 2 folder 21
Preservation master cd, October 28, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0063
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 28, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-041
Estelle Nicholson Dodson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 21, 1980

Estelle Nicholson Dodson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 21, 1980

Records the reminiscences of Estelle Dodson, (née Nicholson), who grew up in a log house in Corbin Hollow, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. Describes her early home and family life, household chores, and school days. Discusses the difficulties of making a living in the mountains during the Great Depression and her father's work as a basket maker. Other sources of income included harvesting chestnuts and ginseng, and selling flowers and berries at nearby Skyland Resort. Recalls numerous members of the Dodson, Nicholson and Corbin families, including her grandfather, David Nicholson and her first cousin, George Corbin, who built Corbin Cabin in 1910. Also includes anecdotes regarding George Pollock, local entrepreneur and owner of Skyland, and the importance of the resort to the local economy. Estelle Dodson's mother-in-law, who is only identified in the interview as Mrs. Dodson, contributes to the interview throughout. A note written on one of the transcripts identifies her as Mrs. Odie Dodson.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 21, 1980 box 2 folder 22
Preservation master cd, May 21, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0064
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 21, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-042
Hunter Dodson interviewed by Diane and Eugene Wilhelm, transcribed by Jeanette Shapiro, October 14, 1977

Hunter Dodson interviewed by Diane and Eugene Wilhelm, transcribed by Jeanette Shapiro, October 14, 1977

Records a fragment of an interview with Hunter Dodson, who grew up near Corbin Hollow, Virginia, and is described as a ranger at Shenandoah National Park. Describes the lifestyles of the mountain people who lived in the area prior to the establishment of the park, and some of the various means of making a living that were available to them at that time. Also includes references to George Pollock, local entrepreneur and owner of Skyland, and the importance of the resort to the local economy. In June, 2009, Dr. Diane Zior Wilhelm donated photocopies of her field notes from this interview to JMU Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 14, 1977 box 2 folder 23
Preservation master cd, October 14, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0065
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 14, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-043
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 14, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-044
Rev. John Dubosq interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 12, 1975

Rev. John Dubosq interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 12, 1975

Records the reminiscences of Reverend John Dubosq, who came to the Naked Creek Mission in Jollett Hollow in 1932. Describes his early years as a minister among the mountain people and their acceptance of him into their tight-knit community. Recalls his pastoral duties delivering sermons and officiating at weddings and funerals. Describes the lifestyles of the mountain people, their means of growing and preserving food, as well as the fruit, chestnut and ginseng harvests. Also reflects on the importance of moonshine to the local economy.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 12, 1975 box 2 folder 24
Preservation master cd, November 12, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0066
Preservation master cd, November 12, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0067
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 12, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-045
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 12, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-046
Irene Eppard interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 14, 1978

Irene Eppard interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 14, 1978

Records the reminiscences of Irene Eppard, (née Breeden), who was born and raised near Thorofare Mountain, in Rockingham County, Virgina, and lived there until the local families were evicted in 1936. Describes her early home and school life, popular community gatherings such as corn shucking and apple butter boiling parties, as well as courting, wedding and funeral rituals. Includes references to the gardens and livestock raised by the mountain people, their methods of food preservation and popular holiday traditions.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 14, 1978 box 2 folder 25
Preservation master cd, May 14, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0068
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 14, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-047
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 14, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-048
Charles H. Estes interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, October 9, 1980

Charles H. Estes interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, October 9, 1980

Records the reminiscences of Charles Estes, who owned a sawmill and several other businesses near Piney River, in Rappahannock County, Virgina, in the 1920s and 30s. Describes the everyday lives of the mountain people who lived around Piney River, popular community gatherings such as hog and beef butchering and apple butter boiling parties, as well as courting, wedding and funeral rituals. Includes references to the gardens and livestock raised by the mountain people, their methods of food preservation and popular holiday traditions. Discusses the various means available for earning money, such as bark peeling, barrel stave making, apple picking and moonshining. Includes anecdotes regarding Virginia governor Harry Byrd and local entrepreneur George Pollock, owner of Skyland resort. A woman identified only as Mrs. Estes provides an extensive description of many common herbal remedies employed by the mountain people, as well as additional commentary throughout.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 9, 1980 box 3 folder 1
Preservation master cd, October 9, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0069
Use copy cd, October 9, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0070
Fisher F. Finks interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, May 2, 1977

Fisher F. Finks interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, May 2, 1977

Records the reminiscences of Fisher Finks and his wife, Myrtle Hurt Finks, who lived near the Big Meadows area of Shenandoah National Park until the mid 1920s. Opens with Mr. Finks reading from family documents that establish the presence of the Finks family in Virginia dating back to 1736. Describes daily life in the mountains, including local agriculture, livestock production and food preservation, as well as the important tan bark industry. Discusses popular community events, such as weddings and funerals, corn husking, apple butter boilings and courting. Recalls the traditional remedies used for common ailments and injuries, as well as a brief discussion on deadly diphtheria outbreaks and the Influenza Epidemic of 1918. Includes discussions of race relations in the region, the prevalence of moonshine and its possible connection to numerous local murders. Also recalls local entrepreneur, George Pollock, owner of Skyland resort and the construction of Camp Hoover, the presidential retreat created by Herbert Hoover.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 2, 1977 box 3 folder 2
Preservation master cd, May 2, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0071
Preservation master cd, May 2, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0072
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 2, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-049
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 2, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-050
Vastine Fisher interviewed by Barbara Wright, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, May 10, 1966

Vastine Fisher interviewed by Barbara Wright, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, May 10, 1966

Records a walking tour led by Vastine Fisher, whose family lived in the Blue Ridge Mountains near McCormick Gap for generations, until the last access roads were closed to make way for Skyline Drive and Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s. Mr. Fisher's grandparents moved off the mountain to nearby property they owned, outside the boundaries of the park. The tour begins near the log cabin where Mr. Fisher's father was born and proceeds to various locations around Calf Mountain, Dean Mountain, Sugar Hollow, Cavalry's Hollow, and Buck's Elbow Mountain.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 10, 1966 box 3 folder 3
Preservation master cd, May 10, 1966 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0073
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 10, 1966 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-051
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 10, 1966 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-052
Annie Virginia Fox interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, December 18, 1975

Annie Virginia Fox interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, December 18, 1975

Records the reminiscences of Annie Fox, who lived in Fox Hollow, near Front Royal, Virginia, briefly after her marriage in the 1930s. Describes daily life in the mountains, including local agriculture, livestock production and food preservation, courting rituals and folk music.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 18, 1975 box 3 folder 4
Preservation master cd, December 18, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0074
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 18, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-053
Butler-Brayne Franklin interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, September 30, 1977

Butler-Brayne Franklin interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, September 30, 1977

Records an interview with Butler Franklin, (née Butler-Brayne Thornton Robinson), a direct descendant of Francis Thornton, III, who built a plantation near Sperryville, Virginia, in the 1740s. Mrs. Franklin contends that several prominent geographic features now located in Shenandoah National Park, including Thornton Gap, the Thornton River and Mary's Rock, were named for Francis Thornton and his descendants. Includes a genealogical history of the Thornton family in Virginia, from William Thornton, III, who emigrated from England in the 1640s, through Col. John Thornton, who married Jane Washington, aunt of the future first president. Discusses several Thornton estates, including Montpelier, the plantation built on the Rappahannock River near Sperryville, and the Thornton ancestral home, Fall Hill, in Fredericksburg ,where Mrs. Franklin resided at the time of the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 30, 1977 box 3 folder 5
Preservation master cd, September 30, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0075
Joseph Fray interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 14, 1979

Joseph Fray interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 14, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Joseph Fray, who was a member of the Chamber of Commerce in Madison County, Virginia, in the 1920s, and witness to the events that led to the founding of Camp Hoover, Skyline Drive and Shenandoah National Park. Describes the work of local, state and federal officials in the planning and construction of Camp Hoover, also known as Rapidan Camp, which was a rustic retreat where President and Mrs. Hoover could escape the heat and congestion of Washington, DC. Fray reflects on the impact Camp Hoover had on Madison County, both as a works project and through the numerous benefits, such as roads, schools, and even air mail delivery, that came in the wake of its construction. Discusses the impetus Camp Hoover had on the founding of Skyline Drive and ultimately, Shenandoah National Park. Includes references to the lives of the mountain people and their sources of income, such as tan bark peeling and basket weaving, and local entrepreneur, George Pollock, owner of Skyland resort. A woman identified in the transcript as Mrs. Fray also contributes to the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 14, 1979 box 3 folder 6
Preservation master cd, November 14, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0075
Preservation master cd, November 14, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0076
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 14, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-054
Homer Frazier interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Mary Anne McDonald, May 15, 1979

Homer Frazier interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Mary Anne McDonald, May 15, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Homer and Virgie Frazier, (née Dwyer), who were born and raised near Sperryville, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, including local agriculture, livestock production and food preservation, courting rituals and folk music. Discusses the annual cattle drives from the lowlands to the mountain pastures.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 15, 1979 box 3 folder 7
Preservation master cd, May 15, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0076
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 15, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-055
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 15, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-056
Miley Frazier interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, May 16, 1978

Miley Frazier interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, May 16, 1978

Records the reminiscences of Miley Frazier, who was born in 1900 near Patterson Ridge, in what would become the Southern Section of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, including local agriculture, livestock production and food preservation, courting rituals and folk music. Discusses the annual cattle drives from the lowlands to the mountain pastures. Discusses the importance of seasonal harvests, including chestnuts, huckleberries and tan bark, to the local economy.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 16, 1978 box 3 folder 8
Preservation master cd, May 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0077
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-057
Harold Garrison, transcribed by Rebecca Popp, Erin Stevenson, and Heather Browne, February 25, 1980

Harold Garrison, transcribed by Rebecca Popp, Erin Stevenson, and Heather Browne, February 25, 1980

Records the reminiscences of Harold Garrison, who lived near Browns Gap, in what would become the Southern Section of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, including local agriculture, livestock production and food preservation, courting rituals and folk music. Discusses the importance of seasonal harvests, including chestnuts, ginseng and tan bark, to the local economy. Includes comments on moonshining, local murders and a 1954 plane crash on nearby Calf Mountain. The second half of the interview takes place in a Park Service vehicle as the two interviewers drive Mr. Garrison through the Browns Gap and Browns Cove areas of the park as he identifies local landmarks and home sites. The primary interviewer identifies herself as Janice Erkel, however there is no written documentation on the exact spelling of her name. The other interviewer is identified only as Tim, and as the driver of the vehicle, is presumably affiliated with Shenandoah National Park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, February 25, 1980 box 3 folder 9
Preservation master cd, February 25, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0078
Preservation master cd, February 25, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0079
Preservation master cd, February 25, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0080
Preservation master cd, February 25, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0081
Use copy cd, February 25, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0082
Use copy cd, February 25, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0083
Use copy cd, February 25, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0084
Use copy cd, February 25, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0085
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-058
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-059
Louis C. Grannis interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, October 1, 1976

Louis C. Grannis interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, October 1, 1976

Records an interview with Louis Grannis, who operated a sawmill on Mt. Marshall, near Browntown, Virginia in the early 1920s. The mill produced railroad ties of various sizes, as well as telephone poles, until the commonwealth banned such activities in the proposed park area in 1924. Grannis discusses the economics and logistics of operating a mill in such an isolated location. A woman identified in the transcript as Mrs. Grannis also contributes to the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 1, 1976 box 3 folder 10
Preservation master cd, October 1, 1976 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0086
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 1, 1976 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-060
Cecil C. Graves interviewed by Diane Zior Wilhelm, March 30, 1978

Cecil C. Graves interviewed by Diane Zior Wilhelm, March 30, 1978

Records an interview with Cecil Graves, who taught in the Page County school system in the mid-1930s prior to becoming School Superintendent in 1944. Describes his impressions of the mountain people who had been relocated to Page County to make way for Shenandoah National Park. Discusses the difficulties many encountered in adjusting to their new lives in the Valley.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 30, 1978 box 3 folder 11
Preservation master cd, March 30, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0087
Preservation master cd, March 30, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0088
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 30, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-061
Matt Graves, Sr. interviewed by Deedee Deane, Vee Dove, Phil Hastings and John Dooms, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, February 23, 1979

Matt Graves, Sr. interviewed by Deedee Deane, Vee Dove, Phil Hastings and John Dooms, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, February 23, 1979

Records an interview with Matt Graves, Sr., leads a small group on a driving tour of a section of Shenandoah National Park near Syria, Virginia. Mr. Graves lived in the region prior to the opening of the park and was able to identify the sites and former owners of numerous homesteads, mills and cemeteries in the vicinity of Milam Gap. Also participating in the interview are Phil Hastings and John Dooms, naturalists affiliated with Shenandoah National Park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, February 23, 1979 box 3 folder 12
Preservation master cd, February 23, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0089
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, February 23, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-062
J. Maurice Grove and Frances Grove interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, July 29, 1977

J. Maurice Grove and Frances Grove interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, July 29, 1977

Records an interview with Frances Grove and her brother, J. Maurice Grove, whose father owned large tracts of land in the Rocky Branch area of what later became Shenandoah National Park. The Grove family raised beef cattle at the time and Mr. Grove would drive hundreds of head of cattle to mountain pastures each summer, and then on to the rail yards in New Market in the fall. Describes cattle raising, food production, and preservation. Includes references to local entrepreneur, George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, July 29, 1977 box 3 folder 13
Preservation master cd, July 29, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0090
Use copy cd, July 29, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0091
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 29, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-063
Paul Harris interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, February 6, 1966

Paul Harris interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, February 6, 1966

Records an interview with Paul Harris, who grew up in the Brown's Gap area of what would become Shenandoah National Park. The Harris family owned a small farm and would supplement their income by tending herds of dairy cows brought up to the mountain pastures each summer. As partial payment, the family would keep the milk produced by the cows, selling it, homemade butter, eggs and other produce to the nearby Black Rock Springs Hotel. Discusses social life in the mountains, the raising of livestock and produce, as well as the moonshine business. Includes a photocopy of a leaf of sheet music and lyrics titled, The Blue Ridge Mountaineer, which was written by Mr. Harris' father, E. A. Harris, in the 1930s. Mr. Harris' brother, Roy Harris, is the subject of an additional interview in this series, SdArch no. SNP-60.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, February 6, 1966 box 3 folder 14
Preservation master cd, February 6, 1966 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0092
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, February 6, 1966 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-064
Roy Harris interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, July 11, 1979

Roy Harris interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, July 11, 1979

Records an interview with Roy Harris, who grew up in the Brown's Gap area of what would become Shenandoah National Park. The Harris family owned a small farm and would supplement their income by tending herds of dairy cows brought up to the mountain pastures each summer. As partial payment, the family would keep the milk produced by the cows, selling it, homemade butter, eggs and other produce to the nearby Black Rock Springs Hotel. Discusses social life in the mountains, the raising of livestock and produce, as well as the moonshine business. Mr. Harris' brother, Paul Harris, is the subject of an additional interview in this series, SdArch no. SNP-59. A woman identified only as Mrs. Harris in the transcript adds several comments throughout the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, July 11, 1979 box 3 folder 15
Preservation master cd, July 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0093
Preservation master cd, July 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0094
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-065
James E. Hickerson, Sr. interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, December 3, 1979

James E. Hickerson, Sr. interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, December 3, 1979

Records an interview with James Hickerson, who grew up in Hickerson Hollow, near Front Royal, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. Discusses home and school life, livestock and vegetable production, herbal remedies and moonshining.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 3, 1979 box 3 folder 16
Preservation master cd, December 3, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0095
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 3, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-066
M.M. Hitt, Jr. interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 19, 1979

M.M. Hitt, Jr. interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 19, 1979

Records an interview with M.M. Hitt, Jr., whose father owned a general store in Luray, Virginia, at the turn of the 20th century. Mr. Hitt ran his own confectionery store in Luray, from 1911 to about 1930. Discusses the retail business at that time and his impressions of the mountain people who would patronize his store. Includes references to local entrepreneur, George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort, and local Episcopal missionary, Mary Deaconess Hutton.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 19, 1979 box 3 folder 17
Preservation master cd, November 19, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0096
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 19, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-067
Rosie Hurt Hoffner interviewed by Nancy Smith, May 19, 1977

Rosie Hurt Hoffner interviewed by Nancy Smith, May 19, 1977

Records an interview with Rosie Hoffner, (née Hurt), who grew up in Madison County, Virginia, near the site of Herbert Hoover's country retreat, Camp Hoover. Discusses home and school life, livestock and vegetable production, herbal remedies and moonshining. Includes reminiscences of frequent visits with President and Mrs. Hoover at the retreat, as well as encounters with local entrepreneur, George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 19, 1977 box 3 folder 18
Preservation master cd, May 19, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0097
Preservation master cd, May 19, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0098
Dorothy H. Housh interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Dennis Carter, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 26, 1977

Dorothy H. Housh interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Dennis Carter, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 26, 1977

Records an interview with Dorothy Housh, whose late husband, Chester C. Housh, was a community manager in the Farm Security Administration that oversaw the forced relocation of hundreds of mountain families from the Blue Ridge Mountains in the 1930s. By the time the Houshes arrived in Elkton, Virginia, in 1936, most of the families had moved away or had relocated to one of the resettlement tracts provided for them in Flint Hill, Ida Valley, Little Washington or Wolftown. Describes the experiences of the mountain people as they adapted to their new lives and the administrative problems that occasionally arose in the resettlement tracts. Dennis Carter, a naturalist at Shenandoah National Park, contributes to the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 26, 1977 box 3 folder 19
Preservation master cd, April 26, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0099
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 26, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-068
E.L. Huffman interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, November 20, 1975

E.L. Huffman interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, November 20, 1975

Records an interview with E.L. Huffman, who grew up near Big Foltz Run, outside of Shenandoah, Virginia, prior to the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. Describes his impressions of the mountain people who lived nearby, their habits, customs and beliefs. Discusses the various economic opportunities available to the mountain people, such as the tan bark industry, ginseng harvest and moonshine. Of particular interest to Mr. Huffman is the Chestnut Blight that destroyed nearly all of the American Chestnut trees in the 1920s and his efforts to rebuild the chestnut population.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 20, 1975 box 3 folder 20
Preservation master cd, November 20, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0100
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 20, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-069
Deaconess Mary Sandys Hutton interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Barbara Maynes, March 11, 1976

Deaconess Mary Sandys Hutton interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Barbara Maynes, March 11, 1976

Records an interview with Deaconess Mary Hutton, who ran the Pine Grove Episcopal mission in the Blue Ridge Mountains in the 1930s. Describes her work with the local mountain families, whom she describes as a noble people, before and after the establishment of Shenandoah National Park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 11, 1976 box 3 folder 21
Preservation master cd, March 11, 1976 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0101
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 11, 1976 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-070
Mamie Johnson and Betsey Harrell interviewed by James R. Johnson, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 8, 1978

Mamie Johnson and Betsey Harrell interviewed by James R. Johnson, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 8, 1978

Records an interview with sisters Mamie Johnson and Betsey Harrell, who were born near Piney Branch in Rappahannock County, Virginia. Discusses the work of their father, Henry L. Johnson, who was a cabinetmaker who often made coffins for the local communities. Describes daily life in the mountains, including activities such as weaving and dying cloth, drying fruit, harvesting chestnuts and square dances. The interview is conducted by their nephew, James Bob Johnson, a ranger at Shenandoah National Park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 8, 1978 box 3 folder 22
Preservation master cd, November 8, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0102
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 8, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-071
Louis Graves interviewed by Reed Engle, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, December 4, 1981

Louis Graves interviewed by Reed Engle, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, December 4, 1981

Records an interview with Louis Graves, who grew up in Madison County, Virginia, not far from the site where President Herbert Hoover would construct a rustic retreat known as Rapidan Camp, and later as Camp Hoover. Hoover paid for the project out of his own funds and the camp was constructed by a detachment of U.S. Marines as a military exercise by March, 1929. Louis Graves recalls speeches given by President Hoover and other dignitaries in Madison, Va., as part of a day-long Hoover Day celebration on August 9, 1929. Graves relates that more than 10,000 people attended the event, including Virginia governor Harry F. Byrd, who arrived at the celebration aboard an Army reconnaissance blimp. Includes a discussion of the economic situation in Madison County in 1929, during a time of prolonged drought and at the onset of the Great Depression. There is no audio recording for this interview; interview consists of transcript only.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, December 4, 1981 box 3 folder 23
Clark Jones and Flora Coonie Jones interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Jim Northrup, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 21, 1978

Clark Jones and Flora Coonie Jones interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Jim Northrup, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 21, 1978

Records an interview with Clark Jones and his wife, Flora Coonie Jones, (née Keyser), who lived in Flint Hill, Virginia, just beyond the boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. They describe home and family life in the mountains, holidays, food production and preservation, and the various cash crops and other sources of income available to the mountain people.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 21, 1978 box 3 folder 24
Preservation master cd, September 21, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0103
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 21, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-072
Eli Dudley Jones interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, August 3, 1978

Eli Dudley Jones interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, August 3, 1978

Records an interview with Eli Dudley Jones, who lived near Rileyville, in Page County, Virginia in the 1920s and 1930s. Describes home and family life in the mountains, holidays, food production and preservation, and the various cash crops and other sources of income available to the mountain people.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 3, 1978 box 3 folder 25
Preservation master cd, August 3, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0104
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 3, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-073
Erma Jones and Lucy Taylor interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, June 4, 1980

Erma Jones and Lucy Taylor interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, June 4, 1980

Records an interview with Erma Jones and her sister-in-law, Lucy Taylor, who lived in Kite Hollow, in Page County, Virginia in the 1920s and 1930s. Describes home and family life in the mountains, holidays, food production and preservation, and the various cash crops and other sources of income available to the mountain people.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, June 4, 1980 box 4 folder 1
Preservation master cd, June 4, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0105
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 4, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-074
Austin C. Judd interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 28, 1978

Austin C. Judd interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, November 28, 1978

Records an interview with Austin C. Judd, whose father, W. Lee Judd, owned a general store near Luray, Virginia, from the turn of the 20th century until the advent of Shenandoah National Park in the mid 1930s. Discusses the retail business at that time and his impressions of the mountain people who would patronize the family store. Most of the store's interaction with the mountain people was based on a barter system, where chestnuts, ginseng and farm produce were exchanged for store credit. Also describes his time with the Civilian Conservation Corps, (CCC), during the 1930s. Includes references to local entrepreneur, George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort, and George Corbin, who built Corbin Cabin, near what is now the Appalachian Trail. Mr. Judd's wife, who is identified only as Mrs. Judd in the transcript, but who is believed to be Gladys Judd, contributes throughout the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 28, 1978 box 4 folder 2
Preservation master cd, November 28, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0106
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 28, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-075
Gladys Beahm Judd interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, March 28, 1978

Gladys Beahm Judd interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, March 28, 1978

Records an interview with Gladys Judd, (née Beahm), who lived near Thornton's Gap, in Page County, Virginia, prior to the advent of Shenandoah National Park. Describes home and family life in the mountains. Discusses the life of her grandfather, B.F. Beahm, a Confederate veteran, who ran a general store and post office in the area for more than thirty years. Mr. Beahm was also responsible for collecting the tolls on the private road that ran through the mountains. A second, unnamed interviewer contributes throughout the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 28, 1978 box 4 folder 3
Preservation master cd, March 28, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0107
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 28, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-076
Loula Judd, interviewed by Nancy Smith, August 3, 1977

Loula Judd, interviewed by Nancy Smith, August 3, 1977

Records the reminiscences of Loula Judd, who lived near the Big Meadows area of Shenandoah National Park until the mid 1930s. Describes daily life in the mountains, including local agriculture, livestock and food preservation, as well as important cash crops. Recalls the traditional remedies used for common ailments and injuries, as well as a brief discussion on the Influenza Epidemic of 1918. Includes comments on local entrepreneur, George Pollock, owner of Skyland resort and the construction of Camp Hoover, the presidential retreat created by Herbert Hoover.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 3, 1977 box 4 folder 4
Preservation master cd, August 3, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0108
Loula Judd, interviewed by Nancy Smith, April 20, 1979

Loula Judd, interviewed by Nancy Smith, April 20, 1979

Continues an earlier interview, (SdArch no. SNP-74), with Loula Judd, who lived near the Big Meadows area of Shenandoah National Park until the mid 1930s. Describes the wildlife found in the mountains, including venomous snakes, wolves and other predators. Discusses the slave trade in the region before the Civil War and includes anecdotes about Herbert Hoover, whom the local people often encountered during his frequent stays at the nearby presidential retreat, Camp Hoover.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 20, 1979 box 4 folder 5
Preservation master cd, April 20, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0109
Use copy cd, April 20, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0110
Virginia and Robert Kenney interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, June 11, 1979

Virginia and Robert Kenney interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, June 11, 1979

Records an interview with Virginia and Robert Kenney, who moved to Dickey Ridge in 1942, within the boundaries of Shenandoah National Park, to work in nearby apple orchards. Describes a way of life very similar to that of the mountain people who had only recently been evicted from the area, in terms of farm and livestock production, food preservation and herbal remedies. Mr. Kenney also discusses his service with the local Civilian Conservation Corps, (CCC), and their work on the park and Skyline Drive.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, June 11, 1979 box 4 folder 6
Preservation master cd, June 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0111
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-077
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 11, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-078
Josie Knight interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 5, 1979

Josie Knight interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 5, 1979

Records the reminiscences of Josie Knight, who lived near Pine Grove in Page County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy. Also mentioned is Deaconess Mary Hutton, an Episcopal missionary who served the mountain people during the 1930s.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 5, 1979 box 4 folder 7
Preservation master cd, April 5, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0112
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 5, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-079
Howard Lam interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Henry Heatwole, December 8, 1977

Howard Lam interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Henry Heatwole, December 8, 1977

Records an interview with Howard Lam, who lived near Jollett Hollow, in Page County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy, such as the chestnut harvest and moonshine.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 8, 1977 box 4 folder 8
Preservation master cd, December 8, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0113
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 8, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-080
Zada Lam interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 23, 1979

Zada Lam interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 23, 1979

Records an interview with Zada Lam, who grew up on the Rockingham County side of Swift Run Gap. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy, such as the chestnut harvest and moonshine.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 23, 1979 box 4 folder 9
Preservation master cd, October 23, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0114
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 8, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-081
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 8, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-082
Nettie Breeden Lang interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, November 1, 1979

Nettie Breeden Lang interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, November 1, 1979

Records an interview with Nettie Lang, (née Breeden), who grew up in Dark Hollow, in Madison County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy, such as chestnut and ginseng harvesting, bark peeling and moonshine.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 1, 1979 box 4 folder 10
Preservation master cd, November 1, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0115
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 1, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-083
Robert Layman interviewed by Diane and Eugene Wilhelm, August 18, 1978

Records part of an interview with Robert Layman, who lived in the Blue Ridge mountains near Nelson County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, traditional farming methods, local Native American groups and the business of moonshine. The comments of Mr. Layman's niece, Hazel Louise Seaman, of Montebello, Va., are interspersed throughout the interview. There is no transcript for this interview; interview consists of audio only.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, August 18, 1978 box 4 folder 11
Preservation master cd, August 18, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0116
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 18, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-084
Louise Long interviewed by Darwin and Eileen Lambert, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 19, 1977

Louise Long interviewed by Darwin and Eileen Lambert, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 19, 1977

Records an interview with Louise Long, (née Varner), whose family owned several tracts of grazing land in Rappahannock County, in the Blue Ridge Mountains, prior to the founding of Shenandoah National Park. Describes the extensive cattle industry existing in the Shenandoah Valley from colonial times until the late 1930s. Mrs. Long and her husband, Arthur Long, Jr., oversaw the annual movement of hundreds of head of cattle from surrounding Valley communities to their fertile summer pastures in the mountains.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, April 19, 1977 box 4 folder 12
Preservation master cd, April 19, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0117
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 19, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-085
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 19, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-086
Mae Atkins Long interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 16, 1979

Mae Atkins Long interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, May 16, 1979

Records an interview with Mae Long, (née Atkins), who grew up in Page County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, including raising livestock, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy, such as chestnut and ginseng harvesting and moonshine.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 16, 1979 box 4 folder 13
Preservation master cd, May 16, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0118
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 16, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-087
Owen E. Lucas interviewed by Norman Taylor, November 28, 1977

Owen E. Lucas interviewed by Norman Taylor, November 28, 1977

Records an interview with Owen Lucas, who went to work at Shenandoah National Park as a truck driver in 1946, and would eventually rise to the position of district supervisor for the park. Describes the kinds of work performed by park maintenance crews through the post-war years into the 1980s. Improved equipment and an extensive network of professional staff has allowed the park to consistently improve its facilities to meet the needs of the ever-increasing numbers of visitors. Much of Lucas' work in the early years centered around the maintenance and improvement of Skyline Drive.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, November 28, 1977 box 4 folder 14
Preservation master cd, November 28, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0119
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 28, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-088
Herman Mace interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, August 14, 1979

Herman Mace interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, August 14, 1979

Records an interview with Herman Mace, who lived along Madison Run, near the town of Grottoes, in Rockingham County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy, such as chestnut and ginseng harvesting, bark peeling and moonshine. The Mace family also derived additional income from a mineral spring located on their property. Bottled water from this spring was shipped as far away as Philadelphia and Washington, DC, until the family was removed from the land to make way for the park. A brief chemical analysis of the water follows the end of the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 14, 1979 box 4 folder 15
Preservation master cd, August 14, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0120
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 14, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-089
Howard L. Maiden interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 13, 1979

Howard L. Maiden interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, April 13, 1979

Records an interview with Howard Maiden, who grew up near Swift Run, in Rockingham County, Virginia. Mr. Maiden went to work for Shenandoah National Park in 1935, maintaining trails and roads, and was still employed by the park 42 years later, at the time of the interview. Describes home and family life before the advent of the park and his work throughout the entire park system, including his part in the building of Skyline Drive.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 13, 1979 box 4 folder 16
Preservation master cd, April 13, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0121
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 13, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-090
Cletus McCoy interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, May 26, 1978

Cletus McCoy interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, May 26, 1978

Records a number of bluegrass and gospel tunes played during an impromptu session of mountain music at the McCoy Store, in Stanley, Virginia. Cletus McCoy's store was renown in Page County for hosting weekly pick-up concerts where local musicians would gather to play for the public and pass the hat for donations. Fifty-six tracks were recorded by Dorothy Noble Smith on a portable cassette tape recorder. Smith and others offer brief comments before some songs, but the titles of many others remain unknown. Includes a photocopy of a newspaper interview with Cletus McCoy written by Smith, however, the date and name of the newspaper are not known.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, May 26, 1978 box 4 folder 17
Preservation master cd, May 26, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0122
Preservation master cd, May 26, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0123
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 26, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-091
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 26, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-092
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 26, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-155
Clarice Meadows interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Jeanette Shapiro, October 16, 1978

Clarice Meadows interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Jeanette Shapiro, October 16, 1978

Records an interview with Clarice Meadows, who taught in the Verbena, Sandy Bottom and Maple Springs schools during the 1920s and 1930s. Describes the challenges of teaching in one- and two-room schoolhouses in those rural, mountain communities, as well as her impressions of her students and their families.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 16, 1978 box 4 folder 18
Preservation master cd, October 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0056
Preservation master cd, October 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0124
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-093
Cleadus Meadows interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, September 17, 1979

Cleadus Meadows interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, September 17, 1979

Records an interview with Cleadus Meadows, who grew up near Thoroughfare Mountain, in Madison County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, including raising livestock, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy, such as chestnut harvesting, tan bark and moonshine.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 17, 1979 box 4 folder 19
Preservation master cd, September 17, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0125
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 17, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-094
Hazel Meadows interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, February 2, 1978

Hazel Meadows interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, February 2, 1978

Records an interview with Hazel Meadows, (née Colvin), and her friend Alice Long Brien, who lived near Big Meadows, in Page County, Virginia, prior to the advent of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, including local agriculture, livestock and food preservation, as well as important cash crops, such as apples and chestnuts, as well as nearby moonshiners. Recalls the traditional remedies used for common ailments and injuries, and community events, including hog butchering and apple butter boilings. Includes an anecdote describing a visit by First Lady Lou Henry Hoover to Mrs. Meadows' mother, when Mrs. Hoover purchased several hand made rugs for the nearby presidential retreat, Camp Hoover.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, February 2, 1978 box 4 folder 20
Preservation master cd, February 2, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0126
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, February 2, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-095
Lena Meadows interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, October 17, 1977

Lena Meadows interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, October 17, 1977

Records an interview with Lena Meadows, (née Taylor), who lived near Jollet Hollow, in Page County, Virginia, prior to the advent of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, including local agriculture, livestock and food preservation, as well as important cash crops, such as apples, chestnuts, and moonshine. Recalls popular community activities, including storytelling, quilting parties and apple butter boilings.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 17, 1977 box 4 folder 21
Preservation master cd, October 17, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0127
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 17, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-096
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 17, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-097
Franklin Miller interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, July 30, 1979

Franklin Miller interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, July 30, 1979

Records an interview with Franklin and Margaret Miller, who lived in Rocky Branch, near the town of Luray, in Page County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy. Discusses the country store owned by Mrs. Miller's father, Homer Fox, and the mountain people who traded there.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, July 30, 1979 box 4 folder 22
Preservation master cd, July 30, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0128
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 30, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-098
Edward Scott and Russell Barlow interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, August 22, 1977

Edward Scott and Russell Barlow interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, August 22, 1977

Records an interview with Edward Scott and Russell Barlow. Both men served in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the mid-1930s and worked together in the creation of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life and the kinds of work performed by the CCC men in laying out the boundaries of the park and the construction of Skyline Drive. Both men recall their interactions with the local mountain people, moonshiners and President Franklin Roosevelt's visit to dedicate the park in July, 1936. Also present, but unnamed in the transcript, is Mr. Scott's wife, Ella Mae, who contributed throughout the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 22, 1977 box 4 folder 23
Magdalene Mooney interviewed by Gloria Updike, April 29, 1979

Magdalene Mooney interviewed by Gloria Updike, April 29, 1979

Records an interview with Magdalene Mooney, (née Simonpietri), who lived and worked at Skyland resort from 1933 to 1935. Describes life at Skyland, the guests and the resort's flamboyant owner, George Freeman Pollock. Includes several anecdotes regarding Pollock's wife, Addie Nairn Pollock, as well as the grand opening of North district of Skyline Drive.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, April 29, 1979 box 4 folder 24
Preservation master cd, April 29, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0129
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 29, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-099
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 29, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-100
Raymond E. Morris interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, November 13, 1974

Raymond E. Morris interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, November 13, 1974

Records an interview with Raymond E. Morris, who lived in Simmons Gap, near the town of Elkton, in Rockingham County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy. Discusses popular herbal remedies, hunting and trapping techniques, bark peeling and the moonshine trade.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 13, 1974 box 5 folder 1
Preservation master cd, November 13, 1974 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0130
Preservation master cd, November 13, 1974 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0131
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 13, 1974 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-101
William R. Morris interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, October 11, 1978

William R. Morris interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, October 11, 1978

Records an interview with William Morris, who lived in Bacon Hollow, near the town of Elkton, in Rockingham County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy. Discusses popular pastimes, herbal remedies, holidays, courtship, bark peeling and the moonshine trade. Mr. Morris' wife, Lillian, (née Shiflett), is also present for the interview and contributes throughout.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 11, 1978 box 5 folder 2
Preservation master cd, October 11, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0132
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 11, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-102
Sattie Mundy interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, updated by Mark S. Purington, December 16, 1978

Sattie Mundy interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, updated by Mark S. Purington, December 16, 1978

Records an interview with Sattie Mundy, (née Good), who spent several summers as a young girl at the Black Rock Springs Hotel, in Black Rock Gap, Virginia. The Black Rock Springs Hotel was a popular tourist destination in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, both for its scenic views and for the natural mineral springs for which it was named. Mrs. Mundy recounts her memories of the grounds and buildings and the popularity of the site in the years following the hotel's destruction by fire in 1909. Includes references to people associated with the hotel and springs, as well as many of the families and local people who lived near the hotel in its heyday. The site where the hotel stood was incorporated into Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s. Also contributing to the interview were Mrs. Mundy's daughter and son-in-law, Marie and Jay Bowman.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 16, 1978 box 5 folder 3
Preservation master cd, December 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0133
Preservation master cd, December 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0134
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-103
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 16, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-104
Edward S. Nicholson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Robin Minter, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, September 24, 1977

Edward S. Nicholson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith and Robin Minter, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, September 24, 1977

Records an interview with Edward Nicholson, who lived in the mountains of Madison County, Virginia until the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy. Discusses popular pastimes, herbal remedies, holidays, courtship, and the moonshine trade. Also discusses his memories of local entrepreneur, George Freeman Pollock, owner of Skyland resort. Mr. Nicholson's wife, Nellie, (née Dodson), is also present for the interview and contributes throughout.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 24, 1977 box 5 folder 4
Preservation master cd, September 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0135
Preservation master cd, September 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0136
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-105
LeRoy Nicholson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, May 8, 1978

LeRoy Nicholson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, May 8, 1978

Records an interview with LeRoy Nicholson, who lived in Weakely Hollow, near Old Rag Mountain, in Madison County, Virginia, until 1929. Describes daily life in the mountains, the means of growing and preserving food and other aspects of the local economy. Discusses popular pastimes, herbal remedies, holidays, courtship, and the moonshine trade. Also discusses his memories of local entrepreneur, George Freeman Pollock, owner of Skyland resort, and his service with the Civilian Conservation Corps during the construction of Skyline Drive.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 8, 1978 box 5 folder 5
Preservation master cd, May 8, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0137
Preservation master cd, May 8, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0138
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 8, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-106
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 8, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-107
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 8, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-109
Nelson and Claudia Nicholson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, October 27, 1978

Nelson and Claudia Nicholson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, October 27, 1978

Records an interview with Nelson Nicholson and his wife, Claudia, who lived in Nicholson Hollow, within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, hunting and fishing. Discusses the limited economic opportunities available to the mountain people, such as the apple and chestnut harvests, bark peeling and moon-shining. Includes references to local entrepreneur, George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 27, 1978 box 5 folder 6
Preservation master cd, October 27, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0139
Preservation master cd, October 27, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0140
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 27, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-108
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 27, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-110
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 27, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-111
Ray A. Nicholson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, September 11, 1976

Ray A. Nicholson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, September 11, 1976

Records an interview with Ray Nicholson, who lived in Nicholson Hollow and on Old Rag Mountain, within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, fishing. Discusses the limited economic opportunities available to the mountain people, such as the chestnut harvests, bark peeling, stone masonry and moon-shining. Includes references to local entrepreneur, George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort. Includes numerous references to Mr. Nicholson's relatives, on both the Nicholson and Fincham sides of his family.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 11, 1976 box 5 folder 7
Preservation master cd, September 11, 1976 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0141
Preservation master cd, September 11, 1976 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0142
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 11, 1976 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-112
Allen Patterson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, April 13, 1979

Allen Patterson interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, April 13, 1979

Records an interview with Allen Patterson, who owned extensive cattle grazing pastures on Dean Mountain in Rockingham County, Virginia. Describes his impressions of the mountain families who tended his cattle, daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship and holidays. Mr. Patterson's granddaughter, who is not identified in the recording, joins the discussion near the end of the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 13, 1979 box 5 folder 8
Preservation master cd, April 13, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0143
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 13, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-113
Blanche Rickard interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 26, 1977

Blanche Rickard interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, October 26, 1977

Records an interview with Blanche Rickard, (née Batman), who lived in Thornton Gap, within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship, birthing and funeral rituals, as well as holiday celebrations. Discusses at length the reaction of family and neighbors to being forcefully evicted from their property by the state of Virginia, to make way for the national park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 26, 1977 box 5 folder 9
Charles Ross interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Alan S. Brenner, November 21, 1977

Charles Ross interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Alan S. Brenner, November 21, 1977

Records an interview with Charles Ross, whose father, Dr. Charles J. Ross, was one of several local physicians who served the families living in the mountains prior to the advent of Shenandoah National Park. Charles J. Ross was born in Taylor County, WV, in 1881. He received his medical degree from the Medical School of Virginia in 1905, and later studied surgery in New York City. Mr. Ross describes the primitive conditions under which his father worked, where access to many of his patients was often limited to horse trails and foot paths. Recalls several deadly outbreaks of diphtheria, tuberculosis and typhoid fever, which were common in the area, as well as the Great Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919, which caused the deaths of millions of Americans across the country. Mr. Ross often rode along with his father during school vacations and gives his impression of the many mountain people he encountered, including many local moonshiners.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 21, 1977 box 5 folder 10
Preservation master cd, November 21, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0144
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 21, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-114
Zenith Shifflett Sampson interviewed by Chris Brasted, transcribed by Tiffany Cole, August 28, 1991

Zenith Shifflett Sampson interviewed by Chris Brasted, transcribed by Tiffany Cole, August 28, 1991

Records an interview with Zenith Sampson, (née Shifflett), who lived on Lewis Mountain, in Greene County, Virginia, within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, the apple and chestnut harvests, bark peeling, and other local economic activities. Recalls popular community events, such as apple butter boilings, quilting and bean stringing parties, church gatherings and barn dances. Mrs. Sampson also recollects the earliest days of Skyline Drive and the impact it had on various mountain communities. At the time of the interview, Chris Brasted was an editor for the Greene County Record newspaper. His interview with Zenith Sampson was the basis for his Life in the Mountains article published in the newspaper on April 1, 1993. A photocopy facsimile of the article is included with the transcript.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, August 28, 1991 box 5 folder 11
Preservation master cd, August 28, 1991 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0145
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 28, 1991 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-115
Edith Samuels interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, October 1, 1974

Edith Samuels interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, October 1, 1974

Records an interview with Edith Samuels, (née Alger), who lived in Joliet Hollow, within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship, birthing and funeral rituals, as well as holiday celebrations.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 1, 1974 box 5 folder 12
Preservation master cd, October 1, 1974 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0146
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 1, 1974 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-116
Ray E. Shaffner interviewed by Darwin Lambert, June 20, 1977

Ray E. Shaffner interviewed by Darwin Lambert, June 20, 1977

Records an interview with Ray Shaffner, who came to Shenandoah National Park as Assistant Chief Naturalist in 1956. Discusses the history of the park since the 1950s, the challenges of running a national park and changes in the public's environmental consciousness.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, June 20, 1977 box 5 folder 13
Preservation master cd, June 20, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0147
Preservation master cd, June 20, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0148
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 20, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-117
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 20, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-118
Jesse Seale interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, March 19, 1980

Jesse Seale interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, March 19, 1980

Records an interview with Jesse Seale, who lived in the mountains near Syria, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies and holidays. Also recalls his experiences with local entrepreneur George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort, who was a major influence in the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. There is no audio recording for this interview; interview consists of transcript only.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 19, 1980 box 5 folder 14
Preservation master cd, March 19, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0149
Preservation master cd, March 19, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0150
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 19, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-119
E.P. and Maude Shifflet interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, December 12, 1977

E.P. and Maude Shifflet interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, December 12, 1977

Records an interview with E.P. Shifflet and his wife, Maude, (née Morris), who lived in Bacon Hollow, within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship, and funeral rituals, as well as holiday celebrations. The Shifflets also recall several individuals who were killed in Bacon Hollow, usually as a result of feuds between rival moonshiners. An addendum to the interview transcript, provided by Dorothy Smith, documents several homicides and trials of Bacon Hollow residents from the early part of the century.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 12, 1977 box 5 folder 15
Preservation master cd, December 12, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0151
Preservation master cd, December 12, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0152
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 12, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-120
Bernice Shifflett interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Tiffany Cole, January 1, 1978

Bernice Shifflett interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Tiffany Cole, January 1, 1978

"Records an interview with Bernice Shifflett, (née Shifflett), who lived near Swift Run Gap, in Greene County, Virginia, within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, raising livestock, holidays, funerals, chestnut harvests, bark peeling, and other local economic activities. Recalls some of the more definitive events occurring in the region, such as the devastating chestnut blight of the 1920s, the construction of Skyline Drive and a famous, local double murder. Mrs. Shifflett also describes the resettlement experiences of her family and her neighbors after the park took possession of their mountain properties.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, January 1, 1978 box 5 folder 16
Preservation master cd, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0153
Preservation master cd, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0154
Preservation master cd, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0155
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-121
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, January 1, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-122
Carl and Gertrude Shifflett interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Mara Meisel and Victoria M. Edwards, April 13, 1977

Carl and Gertrude Shifflett interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Mara Meisel and Victoria M. Edwards, April 13, 1977

Records an interview with Carl Shifflett and his wife, Gertrude, (née Shifflett), who discuss their memories of the people who lived within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship, and funeral rituals, as well as holiday celebrations.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 13, 1977 box 5 folder 17
Preservation master cd, April 13, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0156
Preservation master cd, April 13, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0157
Preservation master cd, April 13, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0158
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 13, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-123
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 13, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-124
Ella Shiflett interviewed by Bob and Pat Momich, May 30, 1979

Ella Shiflett interviewed by Bob and Pat Momich, May 30, 1979

Records an interview with Ella Shiflett, (née Breeden), who lived near Pocosin Hollow, in Greene County, Virginia, within the future boundaries of Shenandoah National Park. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, raising livestock, holidays, funerals, chestnut harvests, bark peeling, and other local economic activities. Mrs. Shiflett also guides the interviewers on a walking tour of the area surrounding Pocosin Cabin, which is located near the Shiflett homestead, where she identifies and describes many of the structures that once existed there.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, May 30, 1979 box 5 folder 18
Preservation master cd, May 30, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0159
Preservation master cd, May 30, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0160
Preservation master cd, May 30, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0161
Preservation master cd, May 30, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0162
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 30, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-125
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 30, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-126
Irvin Shifflett, et al interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, October 15, 1979

Irvin Shifflett, et al interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, October 15, 1979

Records a group interview with Irvin Peanut Shifflett, his wife, Lydia, (née Rosson), J.P. Roach, and his wife, Hazel, (née Marshall), who discuss their memories of life near Rocky Bar, in Rockingham County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship, and funeral rituals, as well as holiday celebrations and local moonshiners. Also present at the interview are Mr. Roach's mother, Lula W. Roach, and his nephew Bennie Cupp. Other unidentified voices can be heard commenting throughout. For a full interview with Lula Roach, Hazel Roach and Bennie Cupp, see SdArch no. SNP-38.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, October 15, 1979 box 5 folder 19
Preservation master cd, October 15, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0163
Preservation master cd, October 15, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0164
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, October 15, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-127
Nettie Sirbaugh, et al interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 14, 1977

Nettie Sirbaugh, et al interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, September 14, 1977

Records an interview with Nettie Sirbaugh, (née Schafftnaker), her son, Clarence W. Sirbaugh, his wife, Beulah C. Sirbaugh, (née Thomas), and Beulah's cousin, Vallie Cave, (née Thomas). Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, raising livestock, holidays, funerals, chestnut harvests, bark peeling, and other local economic activities. Mr. Sirbaugh discusses the local tanbark industry, which was a major source of income for many mountain families. Additional interviews with Beulah Sirbaugh and Vallie Cave are available in SdArch no. SNP-2, and SNP-26.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, September 14, 1977 box 5 folder 20
Preservation master cd, September 14, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0165
Preservation master cd, September 14, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0166
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, September 14, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-128
Jake Sisk interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley and Sharon G. Marston, November 23, 1977

Jake Sisk interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley and Sharon G. Marston, November 23, 1977

Records a group interview with Jake Sisk, who lived near Nicholson Hollow, in Rappahannock County, Virginia, at the turn of the 20th century. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, fishing. Discusses the limited economic opportunities available to the mountain people, such as the chestnut harvests, bark peeling, fur trapping and moon-shining.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, November 23, 1977 box 5 folder 21
Preservation master cd, November 23, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0167
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 23, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-018
Pearl Williams Smith interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, April 25, 1978

Pearl Williams Smith interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, April 25, 1978

Records a group interview with Pearl Smith, (née Nettie Pearl Williams), who lived in an area known as Morning Star, in Page County, Virginia, with her husband J. Benton Smith, until the opening of Shenandoah National Park in 1934. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship and holidays.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 25, 1978 box 6 folder 1
Preservation master cd, April 25, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0168
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 25, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-129
Etta Snow and Charles R. Snow interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, July 31, 1979

Etta Snow and Charles R. Snow interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, July 31, 1979

Records an interview with Etta Snow, (née Breeden), and her son Charles R. Snow, who lived in the mountains between Skyline Drive and McMullen, Va., in Greene County, at the eastern edge of Shenandoah National Park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, July 31, 1979 box 6 folder 2
Preservation master cd, July 31, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0169
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 31, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-130
Etta Snow and her children, May 5, 1978

Etta Snow and her children, May 5, 1978

Records an interview with Etta Snow, (née Breeden), her son Charles R. Snow and her daughters Lucille Wheeler, Helen Hill, and Kathleen Williams as they revisit the Snow homestead in Shenandoah National Park, not far from Pocosin Cabin, on the Appalachian trail. The interviewer is unidentified. There is no transcript for this interview; interview consists of audio only.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Preservation master cd, May 5, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0170
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 5, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-131
Marguerite Sutherland interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, August 31, 1978

Marguerite Sutherland interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, August 31, 1978

Records an interview with Marguerite Sutherland, (née Daniel), who grew up in Graves Mill, in Madison County, Va. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, raising livestock, holidays, funerals, and working in her family's orchards.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 31, 1978 box 6 folder 3
Preservation master cd, August 31, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0171
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 31, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-132
David M. Taylor interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Mara Meisel and Rebecca Popp, December 1, 1975

David M. Taylor interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Mara Meisel and Rebecca Popp, December 1, 1975

Records a group interview with David M. Taylor, who lived in an area known as Joliet Hollow, in Page County, Virginia, until his family was moved to a resettlement area in nearby Ida, Virginia with the opening of the park in the early 1930s. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, etc., as well as how his family and neighboring mountain families adjusted to their new lives in the Ida Valley. Mr. Taylor recalls his conversations with local entrepreneur George Freeman Pollock, owner of Skyland resort and an early promoter of the plans to create Shenandoah National Park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, December 1, 1975 box 6 folder 4
Preservation master cd, December 1, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0172
Use copy cd, December 1, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0173
Use copy cd, December 1, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0174
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, December 1, 1975 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-133
Lorraine Tompkins interviewed by Norman Taylor and transcribed by Tiffany Cole, November 19, 1982

Lorraine Tompkins interviewed by Norman Taylor and transcribed by Tiffany Cole, November 19, 1982

Records an interview with Lorraine Tompkins, who was born on Old Rag Mountain, in Madison County, Virginia, shortly before the advent of Shenandoah National Park. Although her family relocated to nearby Syria, Virginia, when she was two years old, Mrs. Tompkins recounts numerous stories told to her by her older siblings, parents and grandparents. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, as well as tales of famous murders and local moonshiners.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, November 19, 1982 box 6 folder 5
Original audiotape reel, November 19, 1982 Media Cabinet 1
Preservation master cd, November 19, 1982 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0175
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, November 19, 1982 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-134
Norm Trout and Bob Johnson, May 31, 1998

Norm Trout and Bob Johnson, May 31, 1998

Records a conversation between Norm Trout and Bob Johnson, employees of the National Park Service at Shenandoah National Park. The men discuss various issues concerning access to the park, trail conditions and early settlers to the region, including Bob Johnson's ancestors. Included are Norm Trout's detailed descriptions of the scenic views at various points along Skyline Drive. There is no transcript for this interview; interview consists of audio only.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, May 31, 1998 box 6 folder 6
Preservation master cd, May 31, 1998 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0176
Preservation master cd, May 31, 1998 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0177
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, May 31, 1998 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-135
Davis Twyman interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, June 26, 1979

Davis Twyman interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, June 26, 1979

Records an interview with Davis Twyman, who lived for more than eighty years in Syria, Va., in Madison County, at the eastern edge of Shenandoah National Park. The Twyman family owned a general store and grist mill in Syria, and Mr. Twyman recalls his interactions with the mountain people before and after the founding of the park. Discusses the limited economic opportunities available to the mountain people, such as the chestnut harvests, bark peeling, truck farming and moon-shining. Recalls the establishment of the presidential retreat known as Camp Hoover, in 1928, and the impact that President Hoover and his wife had on the local community.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, June 26, 1979 box 6 folder 7
Preservation master cd, June 26, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0178
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 26, 1979 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-136
Charles Wagner interviewed by Norman Taylor, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, August 9, 1997

Charles Wagner interviewed by Norman Taylor, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, August 9, 1997

Records an interview with Charles Wagner, who came to the Shenandoah Valley in 1935, after enlisting in the Civilian Conservation Corps, (CCC), and was stationed near Luray, Virginia. Describes his career in the CCC, working as a laborer, cook, truck driver and eventually being promoted to First Sergeant. Mr. Wagner describes the hierarchy of the CCC camps, the command structure and the types of work performed by the enrollees. Detailed accounts of everyday life in the camps, from the living and working conditions to the educational and recreational opportunities are given. Mr. Wagner also relates his first-hand experiences with local entrepreneur George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort, who was a major influence in the establishment of Shenandoah National Park. There is no audio recording for this interview; interview consists of transcript only.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 9, 1997 box 6 folder 8
Everett Wampler interviewed by Paul Lee, transcribed by Sarah Vaughan and Jeanette Shapiro, July 7, 1964

Everett Wampler interviewed by Paul Lee, transcribed by Sarah Vaughan and Jeanette Shapiro, July 7, 1964

Records an interview with Everett Wampler, who grew up not far from the Black Rock Springs Hotel, in Black Rock Gap, Virginia. The Black Rock Springs Hotel was a popular tourist destination in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, both for its scenic views and for the natural mineral springs for which it was named. Mr. Wampler recounts his memories of the grounds and buildings and the popularity of the site in the years following the hotel's destruction by fire in 1909. Includes references to people associated with the hotel and springs, as well as many of the families and local people who lived near the hotel in its heyday. The site where the hotel stood was incorporated into Shenandoah National Park in the 1930s. Also contributing to the interview were Mr. Wampler's wife, Mary Wampler, (née Garber), as well as Mrs. Mark R. Flora and Lon Shackelford of Shenandoah National Park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, July 7, 1964 box 6 folder 9
Original audiotape reel, July 7, 1964 Media Cabinet 1
Preservation master cd, July 7, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0179
Preservation master cd, July 7, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0180
Preservation master cd, July 7, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0181
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 7, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-137
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 7, 1964 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-138
Wilfred and Beatrice Waterhouse interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, April 16, 1986

Wilfred and Beatrice Waterhouse interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Joy K. Stiles, April 16, 1986

Records an interview with Rev. Wilfred Waterhouse and his wife, Beatrice, who served as missionaries at the Episcopal mission near Pocosin Hollow, in the 1930s. The Waterhouses recall their impressions of the local mountain people, their lifestyles, manners and codes of conduct.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, April 16, 1986 box 6 folder 10
Preservation master cd, April 16, 1986 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0182
Preservation master cd, April 16, 1986 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0183
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, April 16, 1986 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-139
Cletus Waters interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, updated by Mark S. Purington, August 27, 1991

Cletus Waters interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, updated by Mark S. Purington, August 27, 1991

Records an interview with Cletus Waters, whose father owned a general store in the vicinity of Rocky Branch until 1928. Describes his father's business and his interaction with local mountain families. Mr. Waters' wife, Hazel, who is unnamed in the transcript, contributes to the interview.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 27, 1991 box 6 folder 11
Preservation master cd, August 27, 1991 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0184
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 27, 1991 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-140
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 27, 1991 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-141
Delmar Weaver, MD interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Janna W. Zirkle, March 9, 1980

Delmar Weaver, MD interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Janna W. Zirkle, March 9, 1980

Records an interview with Dr. Delmar Weaver, who served the mountain families near Madison and Stanardsville, Virginia, in the early 1930s. Describes the more common ailments and injuries associated with the mountain people, such as pneumonia, rickets and diphtheria, as well as less common diseases such as polio and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Recalls the great lengths to which he and other local doctors went to reach and treat their patients, often for very little pay. Doctor Weaver describes some of the eight murder victims he encountered during the two and a half years he practiced in the region.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 9, 1980 box 6 folder 12
Preservation master cd, March 9, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0185
Preservation master cd, March 9, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0186
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 9, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-142
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 9, 1980 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-143
Frank Wilberger interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, March 14, 1978

Frank Wilberger interviewed by Amanda Moody, transcribed by Victoria M. Edwards, March 14, 1978

Records an interview with Frank Wilberger, whose family ran an undertaking business in Augusta County in the early part of the 20th century. Describes the practice of undertaking in those years, and the special conditions encountered when working with local mountain families, whose homes were often located in remote and marginally accessible areas.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 14, 1978 box 6 folder 13
Mrs. Elzie Williams interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, February 17, 1999

Mrs. Elzie Williams interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, February 17, 1999

Records an interview with Effie Williams, (née Sours), who explains that the Shenandoah National Park headquarters building in Luray, Virginia, is located on the site of her childhood home. Mrs. Williams' father and grandfather ran a small farm and tannery on the site, not far from Pass Run.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, February 17, 1999 box 6 folder 14
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wood interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, March 11, 1993

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wood interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, March 11, 1993

Records an interview with Gordon and Lillie Wood, who lived in Beldor, Virginia, deep within the Blue Ridge Mountains. Describes daily life and farm chores, folk medicine, holidays and funerals.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 11, 1993 box 6 folder 15
Original audiotape reel, March 11, 1993 Media Cabinet 1
Preservation master cd, March 11, 1993 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0187
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 11, 1993 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-144
Lola Woods interviewed by Joy K. Stiles, August 29, 1978

Lola Woods interviewed by Joy K. Stiles, August 29, 1978

Records an interview with Lola Woods, whose family lived in Harmony Hollow, in Warren County, Virginia, near Front Royal. Describes the derivation of many mountain place names and the origins of many of the founding families in the area. Discusses the importance of agriculture to the region and recalls the cattle and turkey drives that would move through the streets of Front Royal.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, August 29, 1978 box 6 folder 16
Preservation master cd, August 29, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0188
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, August 29, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-145
Mr. and Mrs. Luther Wood interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, February 24, 1994

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Wood interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Peggy C. Bradley, February 24, 1994

Records an interview with Luther and Myra Wood, (née Sandice), who lived in Afton, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship and holidays.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, February 24, 1994 box 6 folder 17
Preservation master cd, February 24, 1994 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0189
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, February 24, 1994 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-146
Ray Wood interviewed by Amanda Moody, August 31, 1991

Ray Wood interviewed by Amanda Moody, August 31, 1991

Records an interview with Ray Wood, who grew up on Pasture Fence Mountain in Albemarle County, Va. Describes his boyhood days living in the mountains with his grandfather, Joseph T. Harris, who tended cattle and ran his own small farm. Recalls the daily chores and the cycle of work on the farm, especially the effort that went into harvesting and preserving the crops and meat. Mr. Wood discusses his extended family and the families who lived nearby his grandfather's homestead.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, August 31, 1991 box 6 folder 18
Myrtle Woodward interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Mara Meisel, Rebecca Popp and Heather Browne, March 16, 1977

Myrtle Woodward interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Mara Meisel, Rebecca Popp and Heather Browne, March 16, 1977

Records an interview with Myrtle Woodward, (née Broyles), who lived in the mountains near Syria, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies and holidays. Also recalls her experiences with local entrepreneur George Freeman Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort, who was a major influence in the establishment of Shenandoah National Park.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, March 16, 1977 box 6 folder 19
Preservation master cd, March 16, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0190
Use copy cd, March 16, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0191
Preservation master cd, March 16, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0192
Use copy cd, March 16, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0193
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, March 16, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-147
Dennis Yager, Nelson Jenkins, and Wesley Gray interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, July 15, 1985

Dennis Yager, Nelson Jenkins, and Wesley Gray interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, July 15, 1985

Records a music session featuring Dennis Yager, Nelson Jenkins and Wesley Gray, who perform a number of old-time songs, many of which were popular tunes with the mountain people. Featured instruments include guitar, banjo, Dobro and fiddle. Dennis Yager also participated in an interview with his mother, Mattie Yager, who played several mountain tunes on her autoharp. See SdArch no. SNP-138. There is no transcript for this interview; interview consists of audio only.

Conditions Governing Use:

The Library has made a reasonable effort to identify all rights holders, but in this case, the current rights holders remain unknown or are not located. Thus, some of the materials provided here online are made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107). Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item.

Transcript and supporting documents, July 15, 1985 box 6 folder 20
Use copy cd, July 15, 1985 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0194
Use copy cd, July 15, 1985 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0195
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 15, 1985 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-148
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 15, 1985 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-149
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, July 15, 1985 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-150
Mattie Yager: interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, June 2, 1978

Mattie Yager: interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, June 2, 1978

Records an interview with Mattie Yager, whose family lived near Old Rag Mountain in Madison County, Virginia. Describes daily life in the mountains, touching on the work of growing and preserving food, herbal remedies, courtship and holidays. Mrs. Woodward plays several old-time mountain tunes on her autoharp during the interview. Her son, Dennis Yager joins in at the end of the conversation. Dennis Yager and two other musicians give an impromptu concert of mountain music in SdArch no. SNP-137.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, June 2, 1978 box 6 folder 21
Preservation master cd, June 2, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0196
Preservation master cd, June 2, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0197
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 2, 1978 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-151
Darrell Yarrow and John P. Lillard interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, June 24, 1977

Darrell Yarrow and John P. Lillard interviewed by Dorothy Noble Smith, transcribed by Sharon G. Marston, June 24, 1977

Records an interview with Darrell Yarrow and John Lillard, who were residents of Etlan, Virginia in the early 1930s. Both men give their recollections of the mountain people, their lifestyles and their characters.

Conditions Governing Use:

The copyright interests in this collection have been transferred to the James Madison University Special Collections Library. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library Reference Desk (library-special@jmu.edu).

Transcript and supporting documents, June 24, 1977 box 6 folder 22
Preservation master cd, June 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0198
Preservation master cd, June 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0199
Preservation master cd, June 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 CD SASNP-OP-0200
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-152
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-152
Obsolete surrogate audiocassette, June 24, 1977 Media Cabinet 1 Audiocassette SASNP-CS-152